Earlier this week, YouTube streamed and promoted the live shows of a few content partners including Rocketboom as part of a two-day pilot program.

Whether "live" is viable for YouTube and for smaller content producers, is is difficult to say right now, but the experience of producing live is different and exciting.

Yesterday, as Rocketboom prepared to Webcast its third live show on YouTube, we had a chat with producer/director Leah D'Emelio about the live show and the value of going "live."

We didn't see the live show and unfortunately the live programs are not available on demand from YouTube. 

For a thumbs down review of YouTube's experiment, mostly from a technical perspective, here is a post by Ryan Lawler at NewTeeVee.  Meanwhile over at Slate, James Ledbetter weighs in on YouTube's new live efforts.

Andy Plesser

Production Note:  As you may have noticed, we've been shooting in a studio for many of our segments.  We've been working out of Livestream's new Manhattan offices.  We've been tweaking our production work and this clip of Leah is the best quality yet from the studio. Check out this video in full screen on our customized Blip player.   Looking darn good!   Below is a shot in front of the green screen with Leah and "Molly" (l), host of Rocketboom.  Our interview with Molly to follow shortly.