Beet.TV The root to the media revolution 2017-03-23T20:39:41Z https://www.beet.tv/feed/atom WordPress Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[605’s Dolan: Lots Of Moving Pieces To Audience Targeting And Measurement]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=45077 2017-03-23T20:39:41Z 2017-03-23T20:39:41Z [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR – Although consumers may perceive video content as being no different than traditional linear television programming, programmers and providers should try to look at things across a comprehensive ecosystem. The key word is “try.”

This not to say that a common sales and measurement currency is in sight and, in fact, it seems that more pieces are constantly being added to the puzzle, according to Kristin Dolan, the CEO of data and analytics firm 605 and former longtime executive at MVPD giant Cablevision Systems.

“Coming from the business side of it, we still see there’s very specific differences between linear television versus a YouTube view,” Dolan says in this interview at the recent Beet.TV Executive Retreat titled Video Everywhere! The Transformation of Media & Advertising. “But as you watch children and the changing consumption habits of consumers, I don’t know that’s it’s as clearly defined anymore.”

This is because people watch all sorts of video content right alongside traditional serialized content or traditional sports and news. “So I think for the consumer it’s becoming more blurred, but for the industry we have to kind of get there and figure out who we are and what we do,” Dolan says in response to a question from Matt Spiegel of MediaLink.

What’s undisputed is the importance of being able to sell to and measure the impact on an audience at the household level as opposed to census level, “Because of the differences that are occurring in consumption of traditional television along with the insurgence of digital video,” she adds.

Dolan mentions new questions that arise about the potential valuation of things like earned media and sponsorships, where the visibility of an advertiser’s logo within the video stream also needs to be measured. “You have all the pieces but it’s sort of a mishegoss of different things it’s a bit of a mess but it’s all there,” says Dolan, invoking the Yiddish term for craziness.

She also touches on issues like how long cable and satellite TV operators will be able to continue to extract subscription fees from consumers in addition to revenue from affiliates and advertisers when network TV content is no longer as “exclusive” as it once was.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

]]>
Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[NBCU’s Optimization Offerings No Longer Limited To Upfront Or Scatter Buys, Says Colella]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=45062 2017-03-23T15:31:27Z 2017-03-23T15:31:27Z [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR – It would be an understatement to say that NBCUniversal is going all in on audience targeting and guarantees. Not only has the media giant committed to making up to $1 billion of its inventory available for guarantees in this year’s Upfront season, it’s switched all of its optimization offerings to “always on,” says Denise Colella, SVP of Advanced Advertising Products & Strategy.

“That’s really exciting because we’ve been investing in our data capabilities and our audience platforms for a couple of years now and we’re ready to put our money where our mouth is,” Colella explains in an interview at the recent Beet.TV Executive Retreat titled Video Everywhere! The Transformation of Media & Advertising.

In the past, NBCU’s Audience Targeting Platform was available only during the Upfront period, while its NBCUx programmatic linear product was limited to buys in the scatter market. “Now that we’re seeing the great results that we’re getting and we’ve invested in the ability to scale these, we’re turning all of our data products always on,” Colella says.

Part of the momentum comes from advertisers, which are increasingly investing in their own data infrastructures to enhance TV audience targeting. NBCU has a unique position in that advertisers can use their own data and demand-side platforms to buy programmatically on NBCU’s platform, according to Colella.

“At this point in time we know who is consuming the content,” she says. “The value proposition is really to speak to consumers individually and make sure we’re providing the best return on ad spend for our advertisers.”

Given its plethora of properties—ranging from entertainment to sports, news to Hispanic brands—NBCU has no shortage of insights into its more than 100 million unique visitors.

“We know a lot about our consumers, whether it’s what platform are they consuming our content, when are they booking golf games with our properties like Golf Now, what movies are they watching on Fandango and when are they going to the theatre,” Colella says.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

]]>
Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Simulmedia’s Siegel Fancies Self-Serve Ad Planning Model]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=45066 2017-03-23T10:22:45Z 2017-03-23T10:22:35Z [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR — The company started by the founder of Tacoda and Real Media to help advertisers data-target their TV ad buys now plans to give its customers more hands-on control.

Simulmedia, founded by Dave Morgan, is the latest video ad-tech company to try moving more of its technology to a self-service model.

In this video interview with Beet.TV, the company’s sales VP Marc Siegel says: “We have some really cool things coming out in the next three to six months.

“Our platform, VAMOS, Video Advertising Marketing Operating System, is really going to be something that’s really going to be developed to put in the hands off our key customers.

“(It will) really allow them to use it more as a self-service tool, allow them to be able really to predict and plan on a people basis against really important custom target segments that they’ve built that we can ingest and that we can help to grow their business.”

In the last few months, we have covered moves by Time Inc’s Viant and AOL’s ONE to acquire and launch online software platforms as services that let ad buyers control more of the process.

The move from managed service to self-service is an emerging trend in ad-tech right now. Venture investment is turning away from business models where revenue is linked to ad spend itself, as VCs prefer the certainty of guaranteed recurring revenue and the efficiency of empowering customers to do the heavy lifting some ad-tech providers do behind the scenes.

Simulmedia’s tools give ad buyers access to ad inventory across nine MVPDs and 80 networks.

VAMOS’ Insights section is a self-service online portal through which clients can access reporting for their campaigns, request future campaign options, and receive fast and interactive results.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

]]>
Robert Andrews <![CDATA[FreeWheel Evolves to Enable Range of Monetization Strategies, Van Ullen explains]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=45061 2017-03-23T15:19:38Z 2017-03-22T22:34:57Z [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR — FreeWheel’s video advertising server software is used by both broadcast and non-broadcast media companies alike, to better tap in to demand for their valuable ad space.

But those two segments have very different rationales for wanting ad-tech, so FreeWheel approaches each differently.

That is according to FreeWheel publisher partnerships VP Julie Van Ullen, who sat down with Beet.TV for this video interview.

“More recently, we’ve broadened our scope to include media companies and portals who are augmenting their strategy for monetisation to include video creation or even outstream units,” Van Ullen says.

“(We deliver) the SSP that is built in to the ad server (for broadcasters) … in a very different way than we’re addressing the market of media…”

  • Programmer: “In the programmer segment, the most important thing for these folks is control.” Van Ullen says that includes respecting given competing advertisers space within pre-, mid- or post-roll ads, plus compliance and rights management.
  • Media: “When it comes to the other side of the house … it’s much more about monetisation on the media and portals segment. This isn’t just another demand play. We’ve seen the commoditization of this inventory have a negative effect on the marketplace as a whole. We want that not to happen here. Our SSP exposes … the data that allows the publisher to value their inventory appropriately.”

According to FreeWheel’s latest Video Monetization Report for 2016, last year video companies focused on improving user experience, big news and sports events drove ad views, while more ad buying went automated.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

]]>
Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Videology Sees Linear TV Ads Grow Programmatically]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=45056 2017-03-22T22:28:41Z 2017-03-22T22:26:57Z [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR — Traditional linear TV may not be internet-connected, but that doesn’t mean so-called “programmatic technology” cannot be used to better target TV ad buys all the same.

Over the last year, Videology, a company providing software for addressable advertising across TV and video, saw a 840% increase in the number of linear TV impressions available to be bought and sold programmatically.

The figures are found in Videology’s latest At-A-Glance report on the US TV and video market.

And Videology strategic partnerships GM Tony Yi says a collaborative approach between suppliers and clients in the industry is vital if the segment is to continue growing.

“Because each type of client comes with challenges, we’ve had to learn with them,” Yi tells Beet.TV in this video interview. “Collaboration is really critical to that.

“We’re very concerned about integrating with the right players. Collaboration is extremely important – not only between players in the ecosystem, but also ad-tech players within the ecosystem.”

Videology data saw that a quarter of TV ad campaigns used brands’ own, first-party data to better target where their buys should be made.

This interview was conducted by Furious Corp CEO Ashley J. Swartz.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

]]>
Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Dynamic Ads Give Creative Biggest Upside, Prohaska Says]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=44886 2017-03-22T19:37:23Z 2017-03-22T19:37:23Z [...]]]> The world of digital advertising has spent the last couple of years enthralled by the new targeting, automation and trading super-powers bestowed on it by software.

Now – almost apologetically, it seems – many ad-tech execs take pains to remember to talk about the messages that, after all, make advertising tick.

Indeed, creativity is back on the agenda now that the latest technology can help advertisers shoot and dynamically assemble different ads in different ways for different groups of viewers.

That’s why, over the next few years, Matt Prohaska thinks it is now creative – and not data – which has the biggest head room for growth.

“In terms of which has most upside and room for creative, it’s by far creative,” says Prohaska, a former New York Times programmatic ad exec who now runs his own Prohaska Consulting advisory, in this video interview with Beet.TV.

“The ability to … have data impact creative decision-making at the ops and strats level, before any production takes place; that is starting to happen. We’re moving from one flat, static piece of storytelling to being able to insert different vignettes and moments that can speak to a particular segment.”

Several vendors are now offering advertisers dynamic assembly of creative assets. By and large, clients need to bring multiple components of finished ads to the table.

It is a far cry from the days of shooting a single 30-second clip for all viewers.

But it is also a very different opportunity in digital, one that Prohaska and others say should be used not just to ignite brand interest but also to drive specific conversions like sales.

“Everything is gearing down the funnel,” he adds. “It all comes down to results. Everyone’s keeping their eyes on the same prize, and that’s outcomes.”

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview.   For more videos from event, please visit this page.

]]>
Robert Andrews <![CDATA[‘Creative DMPs’ Will Help Threatened Agencies Adapt To Dynamic Creative: Xaxis’ Moore]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=45031 2017-03-22T00:58:37Z 2017-03-22T00:58:37Z [...]]]> Creative agencies are threatened by the emergence of new technology that necessitates a re-think in the means of producing video ads, and a new kind of software will need to arrive to help them through it.

That’s the view according to veteran ad man David J. Moore, the chairman of WPP’s Xaxis programmatic outfit.

Speaking at a Beet.TV leadership summit, Moore discussed the rise of what is variously called “dynamic creative optimisation” or “dynamic creative” – “the ability to design an ad on the fly for a particular user or user group”.

Unlike conventional ad production, which tends to be for a single unit, ad production for dynamic optimisation often involves creating raw materials for a multitude of different scenes and permutations. In short, the ad may be different every time, depending on the viewer.

Moore says agencies would rather hold on to the traditional way they bill for their work.

“The legacy agency business still tends tone a time-and-materials business,” he says.

“If one of these (dynamic ad-tech) companies helps them save time and money, (they) actually lose money. We have to deal with that economic dilemma.”

A new wave of company – with one foot in technology and the other in creative – is emerging to help brands and their agencies produce ads that are the creative equivalent of a choose-your-own-adventure book, in which the story is dictated by targeting algorithms.

“My belief is the creative agencies will develop what I would call ‘creative DMPs’ and use their own DMP (data management platform) to not only direct the production of future digital but also be able to work with clients and data in a way that preserves the amount of time they’re spending on the account and perhaps even increases it.”

What form a “creative DMP” may take is not yet clear. But its role is important because, as Moore puts it, the creative process, in the last couple of years, has lagged behind the new toolset that is now applied to ad targeting.

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview. For more videos from event, please visit this page.

]]>
Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[Monumental Shift’s Davis: Forget The Funnel, Focus On Outcomes]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=45042 2017-03-22T00:53:07Z 2017-03-22T00:53:07Z [...]]]> Best-selling author Andrew Davis has great disdain for MFOMO (Marketer Fear of Missing Out), CMO Pizza and the “marketing funnel.” He believes that if brands concentrated more on outcomes and not market share, they could avoid all three of these pitfalls.

It was Davis, of Monumental Shift, who kicked off the recent Beet.TV Leadership Summit titled Outcomes, presented by video marketing technology provider Eyeview, with a frenetic and humor-laden presentation about what’s wrong with marketing today. Before building and selling a digital marketing agency, Andrew was a producer for NBC and also worked for The Muppets.

MFOMO is what happens when brands chase what seems to be the next big thing just because they can. “If we hear somebody’s making money on Snapchat, all of a sudden everybody’s on Snapchat,” said Davis.

Likening social media to the decades-earlier additions to the marketing pie of events and promotions, websites and search engine optimization, Davis concluded that the “CMO pizza” isn’t getting any bigger. “It’s just sliced more and more ways.”

He traced the advent of the marketing funnel to 1898 when Elias St. Elmo Lewis sketched out his AIDA funnel model. All these years later, marketers are still obsessed with one iteration of the funnel or other.

“We have to rethink the funnel,” said Davis. “We’re focused entirely on winning market share. This market share battle is just an awareness play.”

One of the most illuminating parts of Davis’ presentation was when he shared insights from Breville, which makes juicers and other kitchen appliances. Without giving away the bottom line, part of the company’s success in increasing the size of the juicer market came from Google Trends, which Davis called “the most underutilized marketing tool on the planet today.”

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview. For more videos from event, please visit this page.

]]>
Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Hulu Taps Ad-Tech Partners For Upcoming Live TV Service]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=45023 2017-03-21T11:01:05Z 2017-03-21T11:00:40Z [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR — Hulu plans to offer its new live TV service in the next couple of months, promising marketers the ability to reach consumers across on-demand and live viewing in one, seamless buying experience.

The company has been trailing the live launch for a few months. Features include the ability to “save anything to watch later, pause Live TV and pick up where you left off, and get real-time alerts for live events and TV moments that matter to you”, the company says, as well as viewer profiles and multiple at-home streams.

Hulu – a joint venture between ABC, 21st Century Fox, NBCUniversal and Turner Broadcasting System – has long been the broadcasters’ favoured aggregator for delivering shows on-demand. But few viewers watch either on-demand or live exclusively anymore.

The next imperative in TV is about experience, and bringing together both live and VOD. According to previews and demos, Hulu appears to have developed one of the most intuitive such interfaces yet. And the implications could be big – a unified way of delivering those main-line networks, both live and catch-up, in the IP-transmission era.

The service will purportedly offering 40-plus channels, and could end up being the networks’ play against digital skinny-bundle offerings launched by cable operators.

“Unlike what you have right now, where you’re searching through the programme guide to see what’s on or you’re checking your DVR or jumping from one interface to the other, we’re going to create a very personalised interface where you can combine live television with our VOD offerings and our growing library of Hulu originals to create a robust television experience,” says Jim Keller, Hulu’s sales VP, in this video interview with Beet.TV.

“We think it’s completely game-changing, it’s elegant, beautiful. From a marketer standpoint, to be able offer people VOD and live television in one consistent offering … we feel we have a game-changing experience.”

The new service will include content recommendations, so that viewers’ on-demand or live consumption informs suggestions for next viewing.

The live TV launch comes at a time when Hulu is improving its advertising offering to help better target ads for specific viewers. That’s something which viewer profiles could assist, but the company is also connecting with a variety of ad-tech tools to help, Keller says.

“We’ve always had a lot of data solutions – whether or not someone wanted to target around age, sex, gender, geographic region or device type,” he says.

“But, as the marketplace continues to move, we are in the process of working with an SSP (supply-side platform) to offer automated solutions and to allow advertisers the opportunity to combine their data with our data to bring more effective targeting.

“Right now, we are int he throes of different levels of integration with most of the key data providers out there, to be able to offer our marketers choice.”

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

]]>
Robert Andrews <![CDATA[How ‘Desperate’ Marketers Struggle In OTT TV: Tru Optik’s Swanston]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=45020 2017-03-21T09:34:43Z 2017-03-21T09:34:43Z [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR — Consumers are flocking to watch TV over new, over-the-top connected devices – but some advertisers are struggling to keep up, according to one exec watching the space.

US connected TV viewers grew 20.6% in 2016 to reach 181.8mn, and will hit 60.4% of the population by 2020, according to eMarketer.

The great migration brings new challenges and opportunities to marketers, who are seeing the way content is delivered change dramatically. But not all are keeping apace.

“Couple of years ago, it was this cool, forward-looking thing,” according to Andre Swanston, the CEO of OTT ad-tech firm Tru Optik. “Over the last six months, we’ve seen a real sense of urgency – for some marketers, almost desperation – to figure out OTT, as their consumers shift dramatically in to that new world.”

But, despite the push, Swanston says marketers face challenges to unlocking the OTT future.

“(There is a) lack of actionable data across OTT,” he says. “TV networks know nothing about their audience across OTT. They aren’t getting registration or login data shared with them from the MVPDs.

“The publishers, their data management platforms work great across desktop and mobile, they don’t have the ability to give them the first-party data and third-party data they need to emulate those capabilities across connected TV.”

Tru Optik’s technology helps marketers with targeting OTT viewers, measuring consumption and tracking attribution using first- and third-party data.

The Stamford, CT-based outfit claims its technology has sight of what 500 million consumers in 150 countries are viewing or listening to, out of a library of 20 million titles.

Videology recently tapped Tru Optik which sees clients of the former use the latter’s data about OTT viewing to better segment and target viewers.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

]]>
Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[MediaLink’s Spiegel: New Audience Targeting Useless Without New Measurement Metrics]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=45013 2017-03-20T23:44:40Z 2017-03-20T23:44:40Z [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR – As Managing Director at MediaLink, Matt Spiegel attends more than his share of conferences and hears more than his share of jargon. So he’s heartened that much of the discussion at this year’s Beet.TV Executive Retreat was about business outcomes.

“We’re having the business impact conversation, which I think is great,” says Spiegel, who prefers to talk about metrics than “sausage making.”

It represents a tipping point of sorts, but only for media companies and marketers that fully understand “it’s about the consumer,” he adds. “One of the things that the industry often forgets is that we are chasing where consumers go.”

He cites as an example statistics showing a 50% year-over-year growth of watching television via connected devices like Roku and Chromecast. For Millennials, that represents about 10% of TV consumption in the 18-49 age cohort.

For marketers of consumer packaged-goods, automobiles and retail products, the viewing shift of younger consumers is something to which they need to adapt, according to Spiegel.

“I think what we’re finding is the industry is recognizing the need to catch up and that we’re pretty close to that tipping point,” he says.

Spiegel believes there are more investments being made in “the right things” on both the media seller and buyer side. If sellers don’t have a grip on understanding their audiences at scale and reaching audiences wherever they are, “You’re going to have a harder and harder time attracting the ad dollars you’re looking for.”

Marketers need to spend more time on measuring the way they reach audiences as opposed to just targeting them. “It’s easy to target new people, but if you’re not creating new measurement models, you’re not measuring new things, you’re going to miss that Millennial audience,” Spiegel says.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

]]>
Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[Amid Audience Declines, TV Networks Must Prove Outcomes: Tom Rogers of WinView Games]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=44866 2017-03-20T23:41:43Z 2017-03-20T23:41:43Z [...]]]> Proving ROI on television advertising is “still in a fairly primitive state,” amid massive network audience declines and rising CPM’s. It’s a paradigm that Tom Rogers believes cannot continue much longer.

Buying TV broadly on demographics without being able to match exposures to purchases leaves little opportunity for measuring spending efficiency, says Rogers, who is Executive Chairman of WinView Games and Chairman and CEO of TRget Media.

Since the financial crisis, most companies have implemented spending cutbacks and increased productivity to help drive profitability. Yet with more than $70 billion spent on TV, it’s been an overlooked line item.

“You would have thought by now that we would have a marketing sector that was infinitely more steeped in being able to deliver ROI based on television advertising expenditures,” Rogers says in this interview with Beet.TV at the recent Beet.TV Leadership Summit titled Outcomes and presented by Eyeview. “And we’re still in a fairly primitive state.”

He recalls that when he was President and CEO of digital video recorder pioneer TiVo, Procter & Gamble was among the first major advertiser to recognize the value of minute-by-minute set-top box data that could be matched with purchase data.

“That’s the future,” says Rogers, given the long downhill slope of linear TV audiences.

For the last 25 years, broadcast network audiences have been dropping by a compound annual rate of about 3% each year, according to Rogers. Since 2014 alone, the traditional linear TV world has lost about 581 billion impressions—or roughly an 18% decline in audience delivery.

“Yet when you look at pricing over that same 25 years, you’ve had compounded annual growth of CPM’s at about 2.5% a year,” he says.

The only way TV networks can adapt is being able to show the value of reaching audience segments based on sales results, or being able to deliver an addressable ad “that can really be connected to an outcome.”

Without such a tool, “pricing I think is going to be dramatically diminished. This will finally light a fire under both networks and ad agencies.”

Even with the rise of video providers like Facebook, Hulu, Netflix and others, “they haven’t filled the bucket of the 581 billion we’ve lost,” says Rogers. “So we’re still dealing with a bit of scarcity relative to total television audience impressions.”

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview. For more videos from event, please visit this page.

]]>
Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[Liberty Global’s Paul: Focus On ‘Attention Economics,’ Not Just Consumption]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=44965 2017-03-20T01:25:24Z 2017-03-20T01:25:24Z [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR – As the world’s largest international television and broadband company rolls out new set-top boxes to facilitate addressable advertising, Liberty Global is focusing on “attention economics.” This departure from simply looking at content consumption is the outgrowth of the company’s ever-evolving data science capabilities.

“The industry has been talking about this around the fringes but hasn’t used the data in a monetizable way to either trade or to drive that value,” Liberty Global’s MD for Advanced Advertising & Data, John Paul, says in an interview at the Beet Executive Retreat 2017 titled Video Everywhere: The Transformation of Media & Advertising. “And there’s a much bigger story there.”

Paul likes the term “attention economics” because the bottom line is understanding Liberty’s customers engagement with content, or “What’s really going on behind it,” he says in response to a question from Ashley J. Swartz, CEO of Furious Corp., the inventory and supply chain management company serving premium publishers.

As CNBC reports, Liberty recently announced fourth quarter results that included a 198% increase in revenue in Latin America and the Caribbean, driving the company’s stock price up more than 15% in one day. During 2016, Liberty added 946,000 new European subscribers and 94,000 organic Latin American and Caribbean division subscribers.

While understanding data and its implications in the marketplace is a must given the current competitive environment, it’s not rocket science, according to Paul. “What we’ve learned mostly out of this is that we don’t need to be PhD data scientists to get the value out of this,” Paul says. “Most of the value that’s being generated not just within our activities but what we’ve observed in the United States, is actually fairly basic applications of data.”

The ongoing rollout of Liberty’s EOS set-top boxes will enable addressable in markets where the company has yet to plant its flag. Liberty is up and running in Belgium, plus it offers video on demand and dynamic ad insertion in the UK, Latin America and Puerto Rico.

Latin America is a particularly special market for Liberty because it’s selling other channels’ advertising, “So they have skin the game and a real reason to generate this value,” Paul says.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV executive retreat in Vieques.  The event and series is presented by Videology and 605.  For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

]]>
Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[Sky TV’s West On Data Enablement And The Five-Country Rollout Of AdSmart Addressable]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=44956 2017-03-20T01:20:08Z 2017-03-20T01:11:36Z [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR – With several years of addressable television, digital ad serving and analytics experience under its belt, Sky TV has committed to rolling out its Sky AdSmart addressable platform throughout its five-country footprint between now and the end of 2018.

One key competitive advantage is that it only charges advertisers for impressions that garner a 75% view-through rate, its Group Director of Advanced Advertising, Jamie West, says in this interview with Beet.TV. West was one of some four dozen advertising and media leaders who gathered for the Beet Executive Retreat 2017 titled Video Everywhere: The Transformation of Media & Advertising.

Sky is Europe’s largest entertainment company, serving the UK, Austria, Germany, Ireland and Italy, West explains in response to a question from Ashley J. Swartz, CEO of Furious Corp., the inventory and supply chain management company serving premium publishers.

“When you think about Sky from an advertising perspective, we’re most known for our advanced advertising products and scale,” says West.

As The Drum reports, Sky takes an agnostic approach to competing for advertising budgets not only with the likes of ITV and Channel 4 with with digital giants. “We as a broadcaster and an innovator have to compete head-to-head and toe-to-toe with the likes of Facebook and Google to truly compete in the digital age,” he told The Drum.

Asked by Swartz about the biggest change to Sky’s business over the last three to four years, West cites data enablement. It’s been a driving force behind not only Sky AdSmart but also Sky AdVance, which West describes as the ability to serve ads in a digital environment “as the result of some kind of consumption, whether viewing to apps or programs.”

The third pillar of the company’s operations is its analytics capabilities, including its viewing panels that now reach some 3- 3.5-million households and provide insights into second-by-second viewing. “With that appended to device ID’s and IP addresses means that we can serve ads across the whole digital estate as a result of that viewing consumption,” says West.

With Sky AdSmart, advertisers are charged only for impressions that have a 75% view-through rate. “On a 30-second commercial, that will be something like 20 seconds of incremental value versus some of the digital players that charge on one or three seconds,” West says.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV executive retreat in Vieques.  The event and series is presented by Videology and 605.  For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

]]>
Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[Fox, Turner And Viacom Consortium: Scale And Efficiency For Audience Targeting, Says Turner’s Porter]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=44979 2017-03-20T01:21:02Z 2017-03-20T01:03:08Z [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR – Underlying the just announced consortium formed by Fox, Turner and Viacom called OpenAP is the reality that audience-based television selling is “complicated and complex,” according to David Porter, Turner’s VP of Ad Innovation & Programmatic Solutions.

To speed advertiser adoption, the three media companies are hoping to make it much easier for brands to define their specific audiences and target them most efficiently, in a consistent manner, with publishers of their choosing. Measurement of campaign outcomes will be reported in a consistent format as well.

“We now have to become very data-centric and almost data experts in order to execute audience-based buys,” Porter says.

Among Turner’s contribution to OpenAP is the more than 100 linear TV, audience-based deals the company has executed to date, Porter explains in this interview conducted at Beet.TV Executive Retreat 2017 by Ashley Swartz, CEO of Furious Corp. Turner has learned a lot along the way.

“When setting up these campaigns, there’s a lot of friction in defining the audience segment,” Porter says. In addition, there’s the job of “getting the advertiser to help us figure out how we’re going to score that with historical viewership data and build that audience segment.”

As ADWEEK reports, OpenAP’s goal is to create a standard audience targeting platform that will allow for more transparency in audience buying and consistency of data use. OpenAP, which will go into beta this summer, will factor into the companies’ upfront talks this year, according to ADWEEK.

“The OpenAP announcement is huge because it will enable scale and efficiency in the industry,” Porter says.

Turner has been offering “two flavors” of audience targeting guarantees: a double guarantee on both the demo and the audience segment within a single network, and a “true audience impression guarantee across our portfolio,” he adds. “Our core proposition is that we can move through a whole continuum of KPI’s.”

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV executive retreat in Vieques.  The event and series is presented by Videology and 605.  For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

]]>
Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[On The Scene At Beet.TV Executive Retreat 2017 With Furious Corp.’s Swartz]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=44970 2017-03-20T03:25:32Z 2017-03-20T01:02:22Z [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR – Take several dozen “intelligent, ambitious, excited and passionate” advertising, media and technology executives to a sunny island and you get some amazing conversations during panel discussions, over cocktails and dinners.

You also get to experience a sense of shared success—whether the topic is television audience guarantees, addressable advertising, or new offerings from the likes of Hulu, Innovid and Spotify, according to Ashley J. Swartz, CEO of Furious Corp. and the self-described Dean of the Faculty of the annual Beet.TV Executive Retreat, which was sponsored by Videology with 605.

In keeping with longstanding tradition, in this video Swartz gives a brief recap of two days of industry give and take in a venue that eschews divisiveness for camaraderie and shared success.

This year’s Retreat was truly a global affair, with the presence of experts from Liberty Global, Sky TV and others. But for Swartz, there was something more basic at play.

“How blessed I am to have such amazing colleagues,” she says.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV executive retreat in Vieques.  The event and series is presented by Videology and 605.  For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

Beet Retreat 17 Participants
]]>
Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Infinite Mobile Ads Demand Platform-Specific Creative: MEC’s Sobo]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=44824 2017-03-17T11:23:03Z 2017-03-17T11:23:03Z [...]]]> BARCELONA — All the world is a mobile screen – but that doesn’t mean mobile advertising can use a one-size-fits-all approach.

That is according to one exec running mobile strategy within a media agency.

“There’s so much mobile consumption, the inventory is potentially infinite in supply,” MEC Interaction mobile head Jide Sobo tells Beet.TV in this video interview. “We need to be careful not to overburden consumers with too much advertising.

“It’s great for publishers and Facebook to increase their yield by putting more adverts in there – but you need to be careful about the experience.”

Sobo is a long-time mobile marketer who focuses on spotting and integrating new technologies for MEC.

Whilst he calls the likes of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat “siloed” “wall gardens”, they are crucial partners, he says.

“We’re seeing great traction but it’s an individual, siloed play, rather than being able to talk to people in their entirety across the mobile web,” Sobo tells us. “We need to keep an open perspective to be able to reach people all of the time.

“The problem is, on the mobile web, there is less data available. It’s a pay-off between data and larger reach.

“It’s super-important to create and develop different adverts for each platform. Between Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, you need to have different creative.”

This video was produced in Barcelona at the Mobile World Congress 2017. The series is sponsored by Turner. Please visit this page for additional segments from MWC.

]]>
Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[BBDO’s Estrada On The Importance Of Partnerships To Leverage Creative Options]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=44945 2017-03-20T01:06:17Z 2017-03-17T11:20:54Z [...]]]> Before the advent of digital media, the unbundling of creative and media at general advertising agencies made lots of sense. Now it takes more effort to bring those functions together so that creative is best suited to particular platforms.

This is one reason why it’s important to bring the right partners into creative agencies, according to Bob Estrada, EVP & Director of Strategic Partnerships at BBDO New York.

“If there’s a separation between media and creative, what’s going to happen is maybe something gets onto a media plan and by the time it gets to the creative agency and it’s sold in, there isn’t the requisite amount of time to develop a great idea,” Estrada explains in an interview at the recent Beet.TV Leadership Summit titled Outcomes, presented by video marketing technology provider Eyeview.

BBDO is always seeking best-in-class partners across technology, ad-tech, media, publishing, social platforms. “Getting them in so we understand their platform and what works today with that platform. Maybe ideating together,” says Estrada.

The end result is being able to take a brand’s creative idea, seeing how it can work on a particular platform and “oftentimes bringing that idea forward to a client along with media and that way we’re crafting something contextually right for the platform,” he adds.

In the old days, before media was unbundled, creative and media types would sit around a table putting together joint plans for clients. “You have to act that way. It takes a little bit more effort and time sometimes, but the partnership route has been very successful for us,” Estrada says.

Asked by Matt Prohaska of Prohaska Consulting to cite the best of the biggest platforms in their understanding of the importance of creative in driving results, Estrada cites Facebook and Google. It’s inherent in their business models to have the best work on behalf of their brand advertisers.

“If there isn’t good entertainment or compelling content that’s on those platforms, users are not going to keep going there,” he says. Estrada believes Facebook and Google have “taken a lot of great steps” to provide third-party verification on what ad campaigns are working on their platforms.

“Being able to know if you’re doing a campaign and how well it’s driving people to store or to offline sales is critically important for us to be able to really determine which outcomes are mattering to our clients,” says Estrada.

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview. For more videos from event, please visit this page.

]]>
Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[Better Measurement Can Plug Digital Targeting Gaps: Nielsen Catalina’s Feigenson]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=44861 2017-03-16T10:44:46Z 2017-03-16T10:44:37Z [...]]]> A “crisis of confidence” in digital media can be alleviated in large part by better measurement solutions. “If measurement is done well, it informs the way advertising works,” says Andrew Feigenson, Chief Revenue Officer for Nielsen Catalina Solutions.

If the advertising industry maps measurement as a key performance indicator, it we can start addressing some of the issues of confidence “and figure out how to advertise better,” Feigenson says in this interview at the recent Beet.TV Leadership Summit titled Outcomes and presented by Eyeview.

He cites recent remarks by Procter & Gamble Chief Brand Officer Marc Pritchard calling for a cleanup of the digital advertising ecosystem as “a pretty bold statement for the industry.” As Advertising Age reports, Pritchard told a gathering of the Internet Advertising Bureau that “the days of giving digital a pass are over.”

Historically speaking, television advertising has been effective and predictable, according to Feigenson. Using media mix models, advertisers have had a pretty solid understanding of what their outcomes would look like.

But as audiences continue to migrate to the digital world and advertisers aggregate them through targeting, “what you find are there are gaps in some cases,” says Feigenson.

In addition to digital fraud and viewability issues, there can be a lack of understanding or “forgetfulness” of the basics of good advertising,” according to Feigenson.

Brands have always spent lots of time testing television creative in advance of launching campaigns. “We find over and over again creative is the most important variable in effectiveness,” he says.

However, “The way of doing that in the digital world is to test more of a feedback loop against effectiveness. I think that’s where there are some interesting opportunities,” says Feigenson. He does believe that progress is being made in the way publishers are proving their contributions to sales lift.

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview. For more videos from event, please visit this page.

]]>
Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Future Ads Will Blend Art & Science, Says Eyeview’s Barber]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=44882 2017-03-16T10:41:55Z 2017-03-16T10:41:55Z [...]]]> If you want to shoot dozens of fragments of video ad permutations to combine in to the perfect single ad for a solitary viewer, you had better skill up both your engineering team and your creative staff.

That’s what Sam Barber is doing. The creative director of Eyeview Digital, a company which helps advertisers pull off one-to-one video ads, says that mix of skills is essential to the dynamic advertising world that is emerging.

“We’re looking at the plan of action almost as you’re looking at a database – you have different data sets in a matrix, it’s multi-dimensional – four-dimensional, if you speak about the time differences of when it’s going to play and the need state of your audience,” Barber tells Beet.TV in this video interview.

“I need people who can think that way as well as be artists. That’s where we’re heading. I’m hoping to gobble them all up!”

Eyeview’s VideoIQ technology “scales a single video asset into millions of broadcast-quality one-to-one video variations, each (of which) is infused with data about relevant products, promotions and messages”, according to the company.

It is one of the emerging technologies that helps advertisers assemble video ads that are personalized to viewers, not just TV shovelware.

But, if blending art and science is the current integration necessity, the next one is in unifying ads across a plethora of platforms, says Eyeview Digital’s Barber.

He imagines “seeing a unified message that’s beautifully executed across all the different platforms … that feels like it’s one voice”.

“If I’m watching an addressable TV spot, it’s talking to me in a certain way,” he says. “(But), if I pick up my iPad and on Instagram, I’m seeing a continuation of that theme in a seamless way – t becomes a singular persona that the brand is presenting.”

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview.   For more videos from event, please visit this page.

]]>
Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[Video At Inflection Point: From Branding To Driving Sales, Says Sequent’s Spaeth]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=44873 2017-03-15T14:15:12Z 2017-03-15T11:32:50Z [...]]]> While brand marketers have employed marketing mix modeling for a long time, it’s not the most effective way to measure the return on digital video. That’s where attribution comes in.

“Attribution looks at things at a very detailed transaction level. Individual people and households and devices, so it’s able to really see the impact of digital video,” says Jim Spaeth, who is a Partner at the Sequent Partners consultancy.

Spaeth is one of a host of industry experts who gathered in Manhattan for the recent Beet.TV Leadership Summit titled Outcomes, presented by video marketing technology provider Eyeview. In this interview, he talks about the impact of video throughout the purchase funnel and the “astronomical” ROI for Honda dealerships highlighted by a Sequent case study.

“Mix modeling is a great tool that serves a great purpose, but it’s not very fine its view of the marketplace,” says Spaeth. And because video usually isn’t the biggest piece of a marketer’s overall budget, it’s hard to get a read on its direct contributions to sales.

Last year, Sequent was tapped by Eyeview to do a deep dive on the importance of video in driving offline sales. Sequent surveyed more than 200 senior brand managers and interviewed some two dozen in depth. The study’s most noteworthy findings indicated that to demonstrate real ROI from video marketing campaigns, brands must embrace a one-to-one model instead of one-to-many.

The research also revealed that digital video is at its inflection point of the adoption curve, moving from a branding to a sales tool. Some 50% of respondents were using ROI as a way of gauging the payback of digital video and about 50% of them said they hoped to be doing so “in another year or two,” according to Spaeth.

He cites the example of TriHonda Dealers (Connecticut, New Jersey and New York), which had “one of the most spectacular ROI’s I’ve ever seen.” Each dollar invested in the campaign returned $7 in profit.

“It was tremendously effective for them,” says Spaeth. “They really pulled together kind of the triple header of strong creative, good targeting and personalization.”

Interviewing Jim Spaeth for Beet.TV was Matt Prohaska (Prohaska Consulting).

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview. For more videos from event, please visit this page.

]]>
Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[Eyeview’s Harnevo: Focusing On Business Outcomes Solves Many Digital Media Issues]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=44887 2017-03-15T11:29:51Z 2017-03-15T11:29:51Z [...]]]> Judging digital video campaigns based on the success metric of actual business outcomes can solve industry problems beyond calculating direct ROI, according to the CEO of video marketing technology provider Eyeview.

“We’re trying to get brands, agencies and the ecosystem to move away from all this arbitrary proxy metrics of clicks and completions and demo targeting,” says Oren Harnevo.

It’s as basic as “Did I help to sell more cars off the lot, did I sell more product, did I win more market share?”

Eyeview’s solution centers on its VideoIQ® programmatic video platform. The company doesn’t actually measure results of video campaigns but uses third-party vendors like Nielsen Catalina, J.D. Power and Cardlytics.

“We make sure every campaign we run for our brands has third-party measurement on it,” Harnevo says in this interview during the recent Beet.TV Leadership Summit titled Outcomes and presented by Eyeview. “We think that’s where the industry is going to get.”

Optimizing toward third-party measurement cures many ills. “Suddenly, you buy media better,” says Harnevo. “Suddenly it’s viewable because you know what, if it’s not viewable it’s not going to sell. You see less fraud. You create more advanced story telling.”

Just as consumers watching video don’t make distinctions about which screen they happen to be using, neither does Eyeview. It’s looking to target specific people and bring them the most personalized stories possible.

Eyeview sees its mainstays as desktop and mobile, but addressable television “is growing really fast,” Harnevo says. “That’s a growing part of our business.” Social media also is on an upswing “and is only going to grow more,” he adds.

Eyeview currently works on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and soon Snapchat and other platforms.

Harnevo stresses the distinction between a company that buys media, which it does not, and one that buys audiences. Eyeview’s in-house designers, visual effects and animation specialists produce and edit broadcast-quality video ads tailored to specific business goals.

“We’ve found that it’s really important to be able to be that creative storyteller and the people who actually decide which audience to buy,” Harnevo says.

To learn more about Eyeview’s approach to using data, audience, media and creative work in tandem to drive measurable results across video and digital media, visit this page.

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview. For more videos from event, please visit this page.

]]>
Andy Plesser <![CDATA[Beet #Retreat17: VIDEO EVERYWHERE! The Transformation of Media & Advertising, an Executive Retreat, March 15-17, Vieques, presented by Videology with 605]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=44520 2017-03-15T14:04:40Z 2017-03-15T01:00:08Z [...]]]> Keynote Speakers 

Kristin Dolan, CEO, 605

Carl Fremont, Global Chief Digital Officer, MEC (GroupM)

Ryan Jamboretz, Chief Revenue Officer, Videology

John Paul, Managing Director, Advanced Advertising and Data, Liberty Global

Adam Shlachter, President, Global Innovation, PMX, Publicis Media

Erica Schmidt,  Managing Director, North America, Cadreon (IPG Mediabrands)

Seth Walters, Sr. Partner, Interactive & Connected TV, Modi Media (GroupM)

Jamie West,  Group Director of Advanced Advertising Sky PLC

Featured Speakers

Scott Braley, GM, Advertising Platforms, Ooyala

Tal Chalozin, CTO & Co-Founder, Innovid

Sandro Catanzaro, Co-Founder & Chief Innovation Officer, DataXu

Ashish Chordia, CEO, Alphonso

Denise Colella, SVP, Advanced Advertising Products and Strategy, NBC Universal

Jason Dailey, Agency Partner Manager, Facebook

Brian Danzis,  Head of Video Sales, Spotify

Michael Dean, VP, Programmatic & Data-Driven Sales at Disney ABC Television Group

Andres Claudio, Managing Director, Hearts & Science, Puerto Rico (Omnicom)

Boaz Cohen, SVP & GM for TV, Eyeview

Armine Khan, VP, Business Development ,WideOrbit Inc.

Jim Keller, VP, Sales, Hulu

Peter Kuhn, Director of Sales, Moat

Francois Lee, EVP, Investment, Assembly (MDC)

Arthur Mimnaugh, Head of Advanced Advertising, Adobe

David Porter, VP, Ad Innovation and Programmatic Solutions, Turner Broadcasting 

Ted Prince, Head of Strategic Partners, Neustar

Marc Siegel, CRO, Simulmedia

Neil Smith, SVP, Markets, FreeWheel

Andre Swanston, CEO, Tru Optik

Ben Tatta, President, 605

Tony Yi, GM, Strategic Partnerships, Videology

Amy Young, Top Partner Lead, Global Partnerships, Google

Julian Zilberbrand, EVP, Audience Science, Viacom

Moderators

Joanna O’Connell, CMO, MediaMath

Matt Spiegel, Managing Partner, MediaLink

Ashley J. Swartz, CEO, Furious Corp

Special Participants

Sam Amiri, SVP, East Coast Sales and Partnerships, true[X] (FOX)

Brian Berner, Head of U.S. Advertising, Spotify

Lynn Lester, Managing Director, Events, Global Partnerships, The Drum

Laith Massarweh, Video Monetization, Google

Gabriel PalermVP Sales, Marketing and Media, Liberty Cablevision of Puerto Rico

Norma Pinero, Director of Media Services, Liberty Cablevision of Puerto Rico

Ronan Shields, Digital Editor, The Drum

Gaurav Shirole, Group Vice President of Product and Client Solutions, 605

Julie Van Ullen, VP, Publisher Partnerships, Freewheel

Charlstie Veith,  SVP, Marketing & Communication, 605

About the Retreat

Now in its sixth year, industry leaders will meet on the island of Vieques for three unique days of high-level seminars, networking and video interviews.   The program will involve just 35 participants.  (The wild horses seen in this video produced by Beet.TV comprise just one of the extraordinary aspects of the small island, nine miles off the eastern shore of Puerto Rico. More on the island’s horses here.)

Topics will include video monetization and distribution, programmatic TV,  addressable TV, the role of data in ad targeting,  emerging platforms for distribution, the changing role of creative and  the impact of consumer preference.

The location is the W Retreat and Spa on the island of Vieques, Puerto Rico.

For the latest on the event, see #Retreat17 and follow us on Twitter @Beet_TV

The Beet Retreat 17 Vieques is presented by

with

and media partner

]]>
Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[In Lieu Of TV Ads, West Elm Embraces Video And Tests Retargeting]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=44909 2017-03-15T14:15:08Z 2017-03-14T11:32:36Z [...]]]> How does a consistently profitable online and bricks-and-mortar retailer thrive without spending money on television advertising? By going big on video, constantly testing and iterating and using ad cost metrics to measure campaign ROI.

“We’re definitely in the camp of being very pro video,” says Luke Chatelain, VP of Innovation at West Elm, the furniture and housewares retailer that’s a division of Williams-Sonoma.

A quick visit to the West Elm website reveals this to be something of an understatement, as there are a plethora of videos explaining everything from how to stuff a duvet to folding a fitted sheet the easy way.

“Oftentimes, we focus very heavily on hand crafted and how we actually bring a lot of our products to life,” Chatelain explains in an interview at the recent Beet.TV Leadership Summit titled Outcomes, presented by video marketing technology provider Eyeview. “And that stuff comes well through video in a very positive way.”

There are a variety of reasons why West Elm shuns TV advertising, among them “You kind of have one big awareness spend and that’s that,” Chatelain says. The company applies ad cost metrics to all of its campaigns across various channels “to prove basically that we’re bringing in more money than we’re spending on that advertising,” he adds.

West Elm also has seen success by using customers’ photos posted on Instagram in its Facebook ads, as ADWEEK reports.

Asked about bridging the divide between technology and creative output, Chatelain stresses the importance of starting small, testing and building up. There’s a massive amount of work that can go into each and every video, but there are small and iterative ways to reach desired goals.

“You don’t have to just get a pixel perfect idea,” says Chatelain. “You can actually try things that are a little bit wacky or out of the ordinary to find what content works.”

West Elm has been working with Eyeview for several months to test personalized video retargeting techniques and so far has seen “some pretty significant results.”

From a creative and targeting standpoint, “It’s very important for us to nail that right out of the gate or at least make sure that we find the best methods, the best creative and the best targeting,” Chatelain says.

Interviewing Luke Chatelain for Beet.TV was Rebecca Lieb (Conglomotron).

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview. For more videos from event, please visit this page.

]]>
Robert Andrews <![CDATA[BoA’s Paskalis Has Three Key Questions For Mobile Ads]]> https://www.beet.tv/?p=44835 2017-03-13T12:33:59Z 2017-03-13T12:33:59Z [...]]]> BARCELONA — Advertising via mobile phones may now be an established strategy – but it is an opportunity that still requires plenty of refinement.

At Mobile World Congress, WPP CEO Sir Martin Sorrell told Beet.TV mobile technology still wasn’t attractive enough to make it a truly engaging ad medium, while P&G marketing VP Sophie Blum said the small screen was a challenge.

Now another global chief marketer is raising the issues around mobile advertising.

“We’ve taken a lot of advertising logic in to what is ostensibly a one-to-one marketing medium – (but) advertising is a one-to-many experience,” according to Bank Of America enterprise media planning, investment and measurement SVP Lou Paskalis.

But Paskalis may have an answer for the industry. Speaking at the congress, he gave Beet.TV a menu of three considerations mobile marketers need to address:

  1. “What is the use case where marketers can win? In an era where the feed is highly personalised, we need to have something contextually relevant that has stopping power.”
  2. “Attribution – are we getting the right signal from the mobile environment so that we can make the right investment in those platforms?”
  3. “A fundamental shift in the campaign mindset, to an always-on environment – we need to be in story-telling mode all the time.”

This video was produced in Barcelona at the Mobile World Congress 2017. The series is sponsored by Turner. Please visit this page for additional segments from MWC.

]]>