Beet.TV The root to the media revolution 2016-12-03T14:46:35Z http://www.beet.tv/feed/atom WordPress Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Trump’s Campaign Success Has Lessons For Marketers, comScore’s Livek]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43693 2016-12-02T12:11:53Z 2016-12-02T12:06:30Z [...]]]> MIAMI — He famously under-spent his rival on TV ads, making greater hay from late-night tweets and sometimes outlandish monologues.

So does Donald Trump’s eventual election suggest a crisis in TV ad effectiveness?

When the most important political period in US democracy turns back the clock on what had been accelerating ad spend, is it time for another playbook?

One ad measurement exec says TV is still relevant – it’s just becoming a part of a new, multi-layered execution environment..

“Well I think there’s going to be another book written,”says Bill Livek, the former Rentrak CEO who joined comScore’s executive vice chairman in the recent merger of the TV and digital measurers.  He now serves as president.

“One of the two candidates, the one that prevailed here in the election, used a lot of these disciplines. That candidate spent a lot less, but he was very selective in what he did.

“I think there’s a lot of lessons to be learned that the combination of what we have digitally, socially, and with television now is working together in this ecosystem.

“I don’t think we clearly comprehend as marketers how fluidly it works with the consumer. We’re clearly still a believer in traditional television because of its mass reach, but we’re also big believers that the future is around the advanced targeting on all the different platforms.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Matt Prohaska, CEO of Prohaska Consulting.

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Data-Driven Campaigns Demand Automation, Horstman Says]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43488 2016-12-02T12:02:11Z 2016-12-02T12:02:11Z [...]]]> MIAMI –The possibilities are endless, the data-points are infinite and opportunities to reach consumers abound.

You want to allocate human staff to run all that? Good luck, says AudienceXpress‘s Walt Horstman – this level of complexity, in the new TV ad ecosystem, needs a fallback to code.

“You apply an advanced dataset that is looking at … the audience impressions against each one of those individual nets and day parts,” he says.

“We’ve got a grid now of 1,200 different opportunities. That is impossible to execute against without having true type automation.

“So, if we are moving into this world of data-driven campaigns, we must have that automation … to make it easier.”

By now, many advertisers and buying agencies are used to using systems that automate the targeting and delivery of online ads.

TV, by virtue of being an upfront-old ad channel, remains an edge case, however. And Horsman sees the pain points.

AudienceXpress’ web-based platform aims to let ad buyers manage campaigns, get reports, optimize details and automate delivery.

“Agencies are struggling to work across all the channels that they are now dealing with, and so they can’t afford to continue to do a lot of these manual processes,” he says. “There has to be ease of use.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Furious Corp CEO Ashley J. Swartz.

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Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[AT&T’s Welch On INVIDI Deal: ‘Huge Opportunity’ For Cross-Screen Addressable Ads]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43679 2016-12-02T12:34:18Z 2016-12-02T03:45:21Z [...]]]> LONDON – If where you spend your time and money says a lot about your priorities, AT&T has anted up in a big way on cross-screen addressable advertising with its participation in the acquisition of INVIDI Technologies.

“We’ve been spending a lot of our time and a lot of our money on addressable television,” Mike Welch, Head of Strategy, Product & Business Development for AT&T AdWorks, says during an interview with Beet.TV this week at the Future of TV Advertising Forum.

AT&T, DISH Network and WPP recently announced their joint acquisition of INVIDI, a leader in providing addressable advertising platforms. In addition to extensive distribution in U.S. households, INVIDI is actively deploying its technology and negotiating distribution agreements in Europe, South America and Asia.

“The INVIDI acquisition is just an example of us being very bullish on the future of addressable,” Welch adds. “We think that there’s huge opportunity both domestically and internationally.”

From its billing relationships with TV and mobile customers, AT&T garners verified subscriber identities. When those identities are coupled with third-party data in an anonymous, privacy compliant manner, AT&T can deliver addressable ads to TV sets and mobile devices.

“We’ll do this with our owned and operated apps,” Welch explains. “So if it’s a DIRECTV, TV Everywhere experience that someone is watching on a mobile device, we’ll be able to deliver a specific, targeted ad to that device as well as to their TV set.”

AT&T’s cross-device reach is amplified through a partnership with Opera Mediaworks, the mobile advertising and marketing platform that serves tens of thousands of apps, Welch explains.

“You don’t have to necessarily be watching content on just an AT&T app in order for us to do this cross-screen addressability,” Welch says of the association with Opera Mediaworks.

Asked about the buy-side sentiment for cross-screen addressable solutions, Welch says “We need to continue as sellers to prove that it works. We’re seeing significant lift when you have exposure across screens.”

He cites the case study of an automotive marketer that saw an 85% lift in buy rate among targeted consumers versus a control group that was not exposed to any ads on any screens. “That’s powerful,” says Welch. “If we could get that story out and make believers out of folks, I think you’ll see this market explode.”

We spoke with Welch at the Future of TV Advertising Forum in London. Beet.TV’s coverage is presented by the 605.  For other videos from the series, please visit this page

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[INVIDI Buys GroupM A Place At Addressable’s Table: Gottlieb]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43684 2016-12-02T12:37:01Z 2016-12-02T03:36:59Z [...]]]> LONDON — In what is beginning to look like a season of exits for video ad-tech startups, addressable TV specialist INVIDI was last month acquired by AT&T, DISH and WPP.

The 16-year-old company has come in to its own of late, by helping advertisers serve household-targeted ads in to TV streams in the two minutes per hour of programming available to MVPDs, as well as gaining traction overseas.

But why did ad agency holding group WPP buy a stake in the company? Irwin Gotlieb, chairman of WPP’s leading GroupM, tells Beet.TV in this video interview.

“We entered in to INVIDI in the first place not because we wanted to control addressability, but we wanted to be inside the tent and we wanted to have influence on how the ecosystem involves,” he says.

“We never had any intentions of keeping our competitors out or of making anything exclusive to GroupM. We just wanted to be there at the table when the ecosystem was formed, and we wanted to ensure that that ecosystem serves the best interest of our clients.

“We retained our position in iNVIDI for exactly the same reasons.”

We spoke with Gotlieb at the Future of TV Advertising Forum in London. Beet.TV’s coverage is presented by the 605.  For other videos from the series, please visit this page

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[UK’s Virgin Media Offers Addressable VOD, Liberty Global’s Paul Says]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43686 2016-12-02T12:32:56Z 2016-12-02T03:26:28Z [...]]]> LONDON — It just launched its new V6 set-top box and a weird Android tablet this week and, though the kit reportedly does not upgrade the advertiser offering, according to The Drum, UK cable operator Virgin Media is already helping serve targeted ads inside catch-up programming.

Virgin Media, formed out of a merger of regional cable operators in the last couple of decades, is the UK’s second pay-TV provider after Sky. Unlike Sky, which leverages satellite for linear broadcast, Virgin Media’s trump card is fiber.

Back in 2010, the operator helped TiVo re-enter the UK when it selected the equipment maker to be its new set-top box. The commitment, made at the time, to embrace a new generation of apps never quite panned out, with a paucity of services running on a box that had become slow before V6’s arrival – although Virgin Media does, notably, carry Netflix and other TV channel apps, as well as broadcaster content through its own EPG.

But Virgin has, for some time, been offering the ability to serve custom ads in to broadcaster content when viewed as catch-up through that EPG. The new box will do the same, but will benefit from greater emphasis brought by a new sales team.

“Virgin is other star of the show,” says John Paul,  advanced advertising and data VP of LibertyGlobal, which acquired Virgin Media in 2013. “It has has a very valuable data set, a very forward-thinking CEO as well, who has created an entity called Virgin Media Solutions. That’s going to be our sales vehicle across all our addressable inventory across Ireland and the UK.”

What will Virgin Media Solutions be doing? Acting as the sales agency for its inventory on VOD and public WiFi (principally, London’s Underground) as well as Irish TV channel TV 3. But most of the heavy-lifting will be done by UK broadcasters who air over Virgin Media.

“We will be selling some aspects of the addressable ad inventory, but we will primarily be an enabler,” John adds. “Whether it’s ITV or Channel 4, they will do the selling of their inventory, we will match that for inventory we control with Virgin Media Solutions.

“We’re only doing it on VOD at the moment. We have quite a range of attributes that we can do addressable against. Our biggest opportunity to improve is the actual dynamic nature of that activity, the automation of it.”

We spoke with Paul at the Future of TV Advertising Forum in London this week. Beet.TV’s coverage is presented by the 605.  For other videos from the series, please visit this page

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Audience And Context Go Hand-In-Hand: Adobe’s Minmaugh]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43589 2016-12-01T15:46:09Z 2016-12-01T15:46:09Z [...]]]> MIAMI — Take two bottles in to the shower? In advertising these days, strategies appear to have bifurcated along just two such lines.

In one, clients continue buying inventory around content deemed to match their target demographic. In the other, they buy super-targeted specific customers, regardless of where they are reading or viewing.

But strategies don’t have to be mutually exclusive, according to an Adobe exec helping marketers plan their executions.

“So much today we hear a lot about … it’s all about audience,” says Arthur Mimnaugh, Sr. Business Development Manager, Adobe Primetime, in this video interview with Beet.TV.

“But what we’d really like to do is work with our supply-side and publisher customers to really understand not just their audience, but where the intersection of their audience is with their content.

“People look at it as an ‘either-or’ and what we really look it as … you’re looking at the Venn diagram of kind of understanding where that intersection looks like and where that overlap is. And where that overlap is represents a massive opportunity to effectively monetize.”

In other words, advertisers shouldn’t have to pick between the old and new style of buying. In the modern ecosystem, they can do both in a way that supercharges the sum total of both.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Matt Prohaska, CEO of Prohaska Consulting.

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Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[Traditional TV Measurement Won’t Lead To ‘The New World’: Omnicom’s Steuer]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43506 2016-12-01T14:53:39Z 2016-12-01T14:53:39Z [...]]]> MIAMI – Marketers are ready to step off the “single-currency television ratings train,” but some agency buyers need to be prodded to look beyond Nielsen on the road to impression-based TV, says Jonathan Steuer, Chief Research Officer for Omnicom Media Group.

The buy side needs to understand that “questions and strategy” have to have top priority, “then you look for the appropriate research tools to answer those questions,” Steuer says in an interview with Beet.TV.

“It’s how the strategy side of agency life appears to work, but it’s certainly not how the buy side has worked because the data there has always been Nielsen,” Steuer says in response to a question from interviewer Tim Hanlon, Founder and CEO of The Vertere Group. “And since that’s the currency, people have said we’re not going to worry about anything else.”

Steuer’s views are shaped by a five-year stint at TiVo and a long career in research. “When I started in research and data in the media world, the great limiting step was availability of data. Now there’s plenty of data available. The question is how does the buy side use it,” he says.

Asked whether the continuing evolution of Nielsen’s measurement solutions will satisfy the industry’s needs, Steuer responds that those are the answers to the wrong test.

“They’re still solving the local ratings problem and the world is moving on to trying to think about impression based television,” says Steuer. “I don’t think their evolutionary path ever gets us to the new world.”

While Nielsen panels are useful calibrations for understanding individuals’ media usage across devices, other inputs are needed. Steuer mentions TVision, “which basically does attribution of who’s in front of the TV set using a camera,” and RealityMine, which did comprehensive measurement of cross-device viewing of the 2016 Summer Olympics.

“If what you’re trying to do is understand that cross-device usage, that super deep data set from a sample is awesome,” Steuer says. “But what you then need to do is take that small data world…and marry that to big data datasets that measure actual delivery of impressions.”

Omnicom’s clients are indicating they’re ready to take the plunge into impression delivery, according to Steuer. “They’re not going to do it with every dollar they spend, but they’re certainly willing to experiment,” he says. “And step off the single currency train and try something else because I think they realize they’re not being well served by the existing measurement tools.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Consultant Prohaska: Addressable TV No Longer Just Theory]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43587 2016-11-30T17:28:14Z 2016-11-30T17:26:07Z [...]]]> MIAMI — It needs to get bigger, but it’s not jus a scribble on a whiteboard anymore – the idea of targeting individual households with custom-placed TV ads, even in linear, is here and now.

So says the man who used to run programmatic advertising at The New York Times, no less.

“And the audience data pipes that have been connected, whether it’s through social or a lot of the same fundamentals from direct mail, are really starting to take hold,” says Matt Prohaska, now an independent consultant, in this video interview with Beet.TV. “You see it in people’s faces around here, where it’s not just theory anymore.

“It’s, ‘No, no, no we’ve actually done this and it’s real, it’s just, okay we want to now accelerate the actual process around this. We need a little more scale, we need the taxonomies to improve.”’Those are all just things that are gradually creating nice progress for everybody.”

Prohaska was responsible for global programmatic and channel revenue for the digital properties of The New York Times in display, search, text, mobile, and video between 2013 and 2014.

Now he runs his own Prohaska Consulting, with clients numbering Hulu, Grapeshot and Toyota.

Prohaska sees a world that’s changing fast. “A year ago, there was a little bit of people putting up crosses and wearing garlic and ‘get that programmatic word away from me completely’,” he recalls. “You’re starting to see enough at bats now from the sellers and certainly on the buy side.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Furious Corp CEO Ashley J. Swartz.

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Media Research Is Now Data Science: TiVo’s FitzGerald]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43588 2016-11-30T15:12:46Z 2016-11-30T15:12:46Z [...]]]> MIAMI — In some ways, it was the usurping of the old guard by the new school. Earlier this year, TV data company Rovi acquired set-top box outfit TiVo in a deal valued at $1.1bn.

Then the combined entity took on the TiVo name, creating a corporation that own box the boxes and the data.

So you’ll forgive Joan FitzGerald for feeling like a kid in a candy store. Previously with Rovi, she is now VPof Product Management & Business Development for TiVo overall. And the long-time TV and data executive is witnessing a big change.

“One of the main shifts is the shift from what I’ll call media research to data science,” she tells Beet.TV in this video interview. “The investment in big data processing systems, that has happened both at the agency level and the media brands.

“Most notably, NBCUniversal, Turner, Viacom have all made huge investments in … enabling those systems to generate more value for the advertisers. On the advertising agency side, you see the same investments – they’re investing in big data and new people to make those operational systems work for them.”

This shift is just the latest in line with a common trend – the boosting of traditional human analytical skills with computer science, allowing customers to do more of what they did before, better and better.

And that’s something the new-look Rovi-TiVo is going to do partly after the acquisition which involved the TiVo Research and Analytics (TRA) unit.

“We’re able to combine the assets that TRA built over a number of years with our enterprise software system,” FitzGerald adds. “For example, they were really the first to market with audience targeting.

“Your whole buying and selling process is just more closely aligned with the marketer’s goals. So we’re really at the tip of the iceberg in terms of helping marketers understand targets in the context of their media spend.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Verte Group founder and CEO Tim Hanlon

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Advanced TV’s National Evolution: MODI’s Bologna]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43631 2016-11-30T14:28:25Z 2016-11-30T14:28:25Z [...]]]> MIAMI — Addressable? Advanced? The way that television advertising is bought, targeted, sold and measured is changing.

The new connection of TVs and TV boxes to the internet is offering up household-level targeting, when ads are fuelled by smart data sets.

In this panel video interview at Beet Retreat 2016, Group M’s MODI Media president Mike Bologna, whose company is working in the emerging space, talks about how things are panning out.

“We all know that that business is developing and it’s building and we’re about half of every US TV household has that capability, and that’s great,” he says.

“You wind the clock back 18 months and you ask an advertiser who they want to reach, and they’ll look you straight in the eye and say adults 18-49. That’s pretty stupid. That’s changing.”

It’s not just targeting that is changing, however. Advanced TV is also getting plugged in to sales data, to show advertisers something approaching the ultimate ROI.

“When the campaign’s over and you tie it back to sales,” Bologna adds. “That’s the beauty of addressable television: if you execute it properly, meaning you get the target right, you pay the right price, and you measure it properly, you will show a higher return on ad spend than most national initiatives.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Furious Corp CEO Ashley J. Swartz.

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Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[New AT&T Streaming Offerings: Fewer Barriers, More Ad Opportunities]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43664 2016-11-29T22:24:02Z 2016-11-29T22:22:00Z [...]]]> Something for everybody pretty much describes AT&T’s launch on Nov. 30 of its three new streaming services: DIRECTV NOW, FreeVIEW and Fullscreen. It’s a way to both remove pain points for consumers—such as credit checks or the inability to access traditional cable service—and offer advertisers more VOD-first options, according to the EVP & CMO of AT&T Entertainment & Internet Services.

In an interview with Beet.TV, Brad Bentley says the company’s research shows that a number of consumers cannot get a TV plan that requires a credit check or a two year commitment, or can’t get cable installed in their dwelling.

“We knew going over the top and offering a customer an option that was more app-based, more software driven, was going to lower our costs and be able to serve an audience that we weren’t reaching today,” Bentley says.

He frames the proposition as, “How do we bring that premium television experience that had been traditionally locked in the living room and bring it to more people and more places.”

By signing up for DIRECTV NOW or Fullscreen, content can be streamed over U.S. Internet connections on any device with a set-top box, satellite dish, annual contract or credit check. DIRECTV NOW programming packages are: Live a Little ($35 monthly for 60+ channels); Just Right ($50 monthly for 80+ channels; Go Big ($60 monthly for 100+ channels); and Gotta Have it ($70 monthly for 120+ channels).

“We’ll offer consumers some choice in terms of packaging, but we have intentionally gone after some of that premium content that exists today in pay TV but just remove some of the hurdles,” Bentley says.

AT&T’s FreeVIEW offering lets anyone enjoy ad-supported video content free of charge from AUDIENCE Network, Otter Media properties and other channels on DIRECTV NOW.

For advertisers, the new services offer new formats so that they’re “not stuck in a traditional pod of 14 or 16 minutes of commercials in a one-hour slot,” Bentley explains. “It’s a VOD-first world where you can place ads within the curation.”

The platform supporting the new services also will facilitate “a better, smarter way to do ads around binge viewing than what exists today in terms of less ad load but more relevant ads,” says Bentley.

AT&T will continue to provide DIRECTV’s premium satellite TV entertainment service.

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Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[Kristin Dolan Maps The Road Ahead For Data And Analytics Provider 605]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43492 2016-11-28T23:41:35Z 2016-11-28T23:41:35Z [...]]]> MIAMI – Kristin Dolan, most recently COO of Cablevision Systems Corp, which was an early player in addressable television advertising, has a new day job. “It’s probably a bigger day job, but one that’s a little bit more self-directed and is really fun,” Dolan says of her role as CEO & Founder of 605.

As she describes the aspirations of 605, a data and analytics firm with roots in targeted political advertising, Dolan’s enthusiasm for mining insights from set-top boxes and other data sources is palpable. In an interview with Matter More Media CEO & Founder Tracey Scheppach at the recent Beet.TV Retreat 2016, Dolan traces the origins of 605 and explains why she’s “excited on a bunch of levels.”

Having sold Cablevision to French telecom firm Altice earlier in 2016, Dolan and her husband James, who had been CEO of Cablevision, recently announced that their Dolan Family Ventures acquired Analytics Media Group, a pioneer in the use of set-top box data. AMG now stands to gain from the confluence of its own “young and bright” minds and the Dolans’ several decades worth of advertising and media savvy, plus the leadership of 605 Co-Founder Ben Tatta, who was President of Cablevision Media Sales.

“It was such a perfect time for us,” Dolan says of the opportunity to invest in AMG, adding that the firm has “a level of experience that doesn’t really exist in a lot of places today, some IP and just a great team of folks.”

AMG’s credentials include work for Walmart and Uber plus “a really nice stable of clients that we’re going to continue to build on,” says Dolan, adding that 605 also will continue to service political advertisers.

Cablevision got into addressable TV in 2008 and now has more than seven million set-top boxes, with addressable available on more than 100 channels. Along the way, it developed its own tools to measure real-time performance for advertisers. “It was fun,” Dolan says of her 27 years in the business.

Now, she explains, “Our goal is to take set-top box data from a wide variety of sources, couple that with a lot of segmentation work that was already done by AMG and then continue to advance that to the benefit of people in the entertainment and media segment.”

605’s short-term focus will be on helping MVPD’s digest massive amounts of data and working with programmers large and small. “For the small networks that aren’t measured, utilization of set-top box and other data can allow them to have a sense of what their advertising and viewership is worth,” Dolan says.

Asked by Scheppach about addressable TV advertising going forward, Dolan cites a report in ADWEEK based on a study showing that 42% of U.S. households now can be reached via addressable TV ads.

“We firmly believe that relevant advertising, everybody wins. Why watch an ad that’s completely irrelevant to you when you can actually be getting something that might be of use,” Dolan notes.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[DataXu’s Tellefsen Draws ‘Graph Of Graphs’ For TV Targeting Data]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43629 2016-11-28T23:40:42Z 2016-11-28T23:23:47Z [...]]]> MIAMI — Want to target new TV ads with scientific precision? More and more US TVs are getting lit up with connectivity, making the real problem a back-end one.

In other words, getting hold of the right data, and combining it in the right way, is becoming the new transformative opportunity in future TV advertsiing.

How does DataXu, an ad-tech company invested in by Europe’s Sky satellite TV provider, approach that problem?

“One of the areas that we’ve consistently heard from our clients and from marketers and agencies that’s a real pain point is the ability to leverage first party and third party data in a targeted way against OTT,” says Tore Tellefsen, DataXu’s VP of TV solutions in this video interview with Beet.TV.

“Today, most of the way the activation happens on the publisher side. You do targeting through contextual or choosing your publishers and choosing your apps and whitelisting and having to do that across multiple different distribution points to try to aggregate enough volume and reach audiences that feel like they’re your audience or that sort of look and smell like your audience based on the apps or the content that they’re consuming.”

It’s enough to give an advertiser a headache.

But the solution boils down to the unsexy-sounding art of combining datasets.

“What we’ve been able to do is take our OneView cross-device graph technology … we term it a graph of graphs of graphs,” Tellefsen adds

“It leverages sort of best-in-class device graphs that are available in the industry with our own household graph and other sources and allows all of those to operate in tandem in real-time.”

After its investment, DataXu is building out its teams in Australia and New Zealand. The company’s founders were doing their PhD work at MIT on Mars mission software, before switching paths.

The company is also trying to get ahead of some big new European privacy regulations that are likely to pose a challenge to the advertising tech landscape in the continent.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Matt Prohaska, CEO of Prohaska Consulting.

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Gaskamp On Videology’s Transition To A SaaS Business]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43637 2016-11-28T23:44:36Z 2016-11-28T23:18:01Z [...]]]> MIAMI — It’s become known as one of the major video ad-tech platforms on the block, allowing publishers and ad buyers to plan and executed targeting campaigns using an online dashboard.

But Videology didn’t start here. Nearly a decade ago, things were a little more hands-on – and the company had to hold its customers hands a lot more.

“When we came into the market, especially on the demand side, they were juggling all the display DSPs, the mobile DSPs; everything was separated at that time,” remembers Brent Gaskamp, Videology’s SVP for north American development. “And they were like, ‘Oh my God, here comes video. What am I going to do with this? Please, do it for me.’ Right?

“People needed somebody to look at video kind of separately from everything else that was going on in their world. And, over time, those clients have evolved into being self-service.

“I think somewhere around 95% of what we do is the self-service world, and then we have a few clients that still need help in various areas and we support them there.”

Videology’s tools include campaign planning, management and measurement for buyers, and inventory and audience management for publishers, while the outfit has also extended from digital video to linear TV.

While peer vendors have gone through consolidation or IPO, Videology remains independent.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Matt Prohaska, CEO of Prohaska Consulting.

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[‘Affinity Targeting’ Shows Marketers Unexpected Correlations, 4C’s Gupta Says]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43504 2016-11-28T00:04:04Z 2016-11-28T00:04:04Z [...]]]> MIAMI — What do Santa Claus and a stick of gum teach marketers about the future of advertising? Turns out, plenty, according to one ad-tech firm helping advertisers leverage social data to target TV and other commercials.

4C Insights’ Anupam Gupta calls it “affinity targeting”, and he says the new technique could be powerful.

“So, if you think about what’s happening on social from each of us as a consumer, right, everything we do on social media, whether it’s a tweet, a post, a comment, a like… that is an active action, right?,” Gupta tells Beet.TV in this video interview.

“So if you tap into that, right, there’s extremely rich data in an observed setting, right? Completely real data, real people, right, that you can kind of mine to get some real insights.”

Rated highly as an employer on Glassdoor, 4C Insights offers advertisers activations and analytics including ads delivered in social media that are linked to real-time TV play-out.

In September, the outfit took on a $26m Series C investment designed to fuel expansion across the world and in its product line-up – specifically, in the kind of affinity targeting delivery Gupta is talking about.

So what’s an example? Gupta explains: “Last year, we found that people who are following Santa Claus around a holiday timeframe, right, also had a very strong what we call ‘affinity’, right, you know, with a nicotine gum.

“Sometimes it comes up with extremely, you know, non-obvious, you know, kind of scenarios. You say, ‘Hey, listen, you know, people spending time with their kids and families are making a decision or trying to quit smoking at the time’.

“A marketer could take action very quickly on social media to run campaigns with the right creative etcetera to exactly those people who express this kind of behavior. The key here is combining signals, right, you know, from, let’s say. social media or other affinity sources.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Matt Prohaska, CEO of Prohaska Consulting.

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Digital & TV Sales Teams Are Merging, Clypd’s Burke Sees]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43592 2016-11-27T23:56:13Z 2016-11-27T23:56:13Z [...]]]> MIAMI — “Never the twain shall meet”, the saying goes. But, in the historically-separate worlds of TV and online ad sales, the walls are finally starting to come down.

“Convergence is a word that comes up in every single panel that we’re all at, but convergence is real,” says Jason Burke, VP of strategic development at Clypd, a software company helping TV companies tool up to sell to modern marketers.

“We’re seeing unification of sales teams. Traditionally, digital and linear TV sales teams are separate. Now they’re starting to come together. You see the same thing on the agency side. It’s not happening overnight, but it’s starting to happen.”

This year, Clypd has been staffing up for Europe expansion after taking investment from German media conglomerate RTL Group.

Fox Network Group and Discovery are using Clypd as part of their work with ad buyers through their 2017 upfront ad sales season.

And Burke says upfront and scatter TV ad sales are not going away any time soon, though their yield is being boosted by new technologies.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Matt Prohaska, CEO of Prohaska Consulting.

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Integral Ad Science To Attack Zombie TVs After Dark, GM Lenane Says]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43590 2016-11-27T23:54:07Z 2016-11-27T23:54:07Z [...]]]> MIAMI — This year, it’s launched new services to help advertisers overcome viewability issues for mobile video. Next year, it scales up to the big screen.

Integral Ad Science, whose technologies help advertisers and agencies understand the viewability and quality of the inventory they are buying, is coming to TV.

“2017’s going to bring a lot of innovation for Integral Ad Science,” says video GM Kevin Lenane. “One of the things we’re really excited about … is the connected TV space and the programmatic TV space, and we will be in that market in 2017.”

Why does Lenane need to measure video viewing on TV? After all, TV is generally considered to be the holy grail of viewability. And TV so far remains untained by the kind of ad fraud practices we have seen in online display and video.

But things are changing.

“Connected TV inventory is generally 100% viewable, and, in some platforms, you actually physically cannot deliver an ad that isn’t 100% viewable,” Lenane concedes. “So why measure viewability?

“We’ve seen new fraud models out there where people activate TVs in the middle of the night. There are just all kinds of things that will pop up as the market gets larger and more lucrative, and so we plan to be there. I think viewability will just be the first step.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[AdMedia Veteran Scheppach: Addressable Is Premium Television Inventory]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43610 2016-11-27T23:50:36Z 2016-11-27T23:50:36Z [...]]]> MIAMI – With some 250 addressable television ad campaigns under her belt, Tracey Scheppach’s worldview as she ventures out on her own can be summed up in four words: “From the couch out.”

That’s because the CEO & Founder of the agency Matter More Media intends to “push myself to do everything different than a normal agency would do,” Scheppach explains during an interview at the recent Beet.TV Retreat 2016. “Right now, a lot of digital players are building digital back to the couch. I like to think of TV as the first thought, not an afterthought.”

Interviewed by Tim Hanlon, Founder and CEO of The Vertere Group, Scheppach traces the genesis of her fledgling business effort to a personal desire to make media matter more for advertisers, consumers and programmers. “I do believe in the long term, all television is digital, all digital is addressable and all addressable is programmatic,” is how she sees the future.

Even though just about one percent of TV spending is done on an addressable basis, “I do believe that’s a great place to start,” she notes, adding “There’s a huge mid market” of advertisers that are great candidates for addressable.

One of her favorite examples is the $2,000 Peloton spin bike, which Scheppach thinks “is perfect for addressable” because of its price point and niche audience. To her chagrin, Peloton ran direct response ads during the recent World Series, “which I don’t think is right for their brand.”

As she seeks her first clients for Matter More Media, Scheppach has a good idea of her better prospects: marketers with between $10 million and $20 million to spend and an incidence size of between five and 15 percent.

Asked by Hanlon to place addressable TV ads on the spectrum of pricing—from premium to direct response—Scheppach says “I think of addressable as premium” but notes that it’s still early in the pricing game.

“Some categories are starting to get priced out of the marketplace,” says Scheppach, citing the example of consumer packaged-goods. “It’s very hard if you’re selling bleach and you make five dollars a year on a loyal customer to justify addressable CPM’s.”

It will be up to individual media sellers to understand where to price the marketplace. “It’s really early to make any kind of bets on where addressable should end. But I believe it’s a premium product,” Scheppach says.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Customer Data Unlocks Campaign Success, Simulmedia’s Storan Says]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43591 2016-11-27T23:45:12Z 2016-11-27T23:45:12Z [...]]]> MIAMI — It’s the outfit that promises advertisers guaranteed business returns, even from television advertising. So what does Simulmedia say is the key to unlocking results?

Brands win best when they bring first-party data to the table, says the company’s Jeff Storan.

“The types of advertisers with which we’ve been able to deliver the most value are those that have large stores of customer data and have a direct relationship with their customers,” says the company’s marketing VP.

“Retailers, financial services companies, travel category advertisers… we can match their CRM data with our set top box data panel and use that as a basis for finding their target audiences. They can activate their own customer segmentations, they can use it to find within their customer segmentation more responsive audiences to their advertising message.”

The worlds of advertising and marketing are colliding because marketing, which often revolves around gathering and leveraging customer data, is now getting plugged in to advertising technology, which can super-target audiences.

There has been a lot of hype about that collision. And Storan says that customer data can best serve an ad campaign.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Verte Group founder and CEO Tim Hanlon

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[‘Satellite Switching’ Could Beam Down Nationwide Addressability: INVIDI’s Downey]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43412 2016-11-24T15:10:48Z 2016-11-23T22:51:05Z [...]]]> MIAMI — If you thought advertising technology was becoming like rocket science, you may surprised how right you are – next up, TV ad-tech is going in to space.

TV ad technology provider INVIDI, which enables household-level TV ad targeting for broadcast companies more used to beaming out a single message en masse, is getting excited about a technology “satellite switching”.

How could satellites enable addressability? INVIDI CEO Dave Downey explains, in this video interview with Beet.TV.

“Until recently, the bandwidth on those satellites was in very high demand, they were very expensive,” he says. “With the advent of low-orbit satellites … there’s an abundance of geo-stationery transponder space.

“INIVIDI came up with the idea of switching the ads on some of these transponders, that are now not being used at all, to broadcast TV feeds.”

That means satellite TV operators wouldn’t just have to pre-load a selection of ads to subscribers’ DVRs, for targeting at the client end – they could also light up their entire footprint with addressability.

“If it was able to be launched in North America, it would be a great caveat to introducing national addressability,” Downey adds. “If you were to target the four or five broadcast networks, this may be an ability to get to another 25 to 30 million homes.”

For now, New Jersey-based INVIDI, which has a growing business of its own overseas, is targeting international operators with the technology.

In South America, Downey aims to help operators launch background channels carrying ads, which would be switched to during addressable moments.

This interview was conducted by Matter More Media CEO Tracey Scheppach for Beet.TV.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[Advanced TV Specialist Scheppach: Addressable Works For All Advertisers]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43405 2016-11-23T23:31:38Z 2016-11-23T12:23:28Z [...]]]> MIAMI – Former Starcom MediaVest Group advanced television specialist Tracey Scheppach not only believes that addressable TV advertising works for all marketers but that a sweet spot exists in terms of spending. “An area that I think is ripe for this innovation is what I call mid market,” Scheppach explains in an interview with Beet.TV. “Somewhere around $40 million in TV budget, maybe a little less. TV is opening up for the first time to this mid market.”

Before starting her own agency, Matter More Media, Scheppach spent 15 years in the advanced TV space. Over the last three years she was involved with more than 250 campaigns and executed about $100 million of media.

“I’m a firm believer in addressable advertising, taking really advanced datasets and being able to finally deliver it to individual households,” says Scheppach.

Asked by interviewer Tim Hanlon, Founder and CEO of The Vertere Group, to cite examples of potential clients suited to addressable TV, Scheppach says, “I do believe that addressable television works for all advertisers.”

This is because all advertisers have a “true target” and Scheppach believes that target constitutes less than the 30% of U.S. households that can be reached via addressable ads. Her professional background also includes direct mail campaigns, which like addressable TV targets households by name and address.

“Direct mail is another place that I’m interested to see if I can convert some direct mail budgets to sight, sound and motion of television, because it’s the exact same principles,” she says.

Scheppach points to the Peloton indoor exercise bike as an example of a product well suited to very targeted messaging. The $2,000 spin bike is sold with a $30 monthly subscription to workout videos that can be viewed on its built-in screen.

“It’s a high-priced item with a fairly defined target set that’s below 30% of the U.S. population,” Scheppach says. “I think there is a key place for advertisers like that, the blue aprons of the world.”

Asked by Hanlon what drove her decision to leave the mega agency world for a startup of her own, Scheppach says she asked herself what it is she truly enjoys about the business. “It stemmed from a love of television and concern over the fact it wasn’t being properly monetized,” she says. Hence the name Matter More Media.

Direct-response TV advertisers also have much to gain from addressable ads, according to Scheppach. “It’s a really interesting category because they are incredibly data driven,” she says of DRTV. “That too is a potentially ripe category for matter more.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[Explaining Advanced TV To Advertisers: A Challenge And Refreshing, Says Cadreon’s Mantel]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43457 2016-11-24T15:14:27Z 2016-11-23T12:17:46Z [...]]]> MIAMI – “If it’s not broken why fix it” is just one of many conversations agencies must have with their clients when the subject is advanced television targeting. And it’s often long-time TV advertisers that need the most hand holding as they march into the data-enhanced future.

To Larene Mantel, it’s been “a challenge and refreshing at the same time” to explain advanced TV to the uninitiated. The Director of Advanced TV at IPG Mediabrands’ Cadreon has deep roots in the traditional TV space from stints at ZenithMedia and PHD and so is well suited to the task.

“There are a lot of clients who are digital in background and are willing to do new things in the space and test and learn,” Mantel says in an interview with Beet.TV. “But there are clients that are traditional and very rooted in their traditional TV and their GRP’s. They know that this has worked in the past and if it’s not broken why fix it. It’s very interesting to have those conversations.”

Smaller, digital-based clients approach advanced TV strategies and tactics with a different comfort level, according to Mantel. “They’re not having to spend as much money to reach their target audience and that opens up the door for them to get into TV,” she says in response to a question from interviewer Tim Hanlon, Founder and CEO of The Vertere Group.

Some traditional TV advertisers are more sheepish. “Sometimes they have sponsorships and that’s working for them. That’s where they’re having mass awareness,” Mantel says. “Some clients are not focused on a niche audience. They want to reach everyone.”

As addressable TV becomes pervasive, some clients are willing to test and learn, according to Mantel. Hurdles to experimentation include clients that are rooted in their networks and dayparts and knowing exactly where their ads are going to run, which runs counter to how addressable works.

“Changing that mindset and helping them feel comfortable and focusing on the target audience and making sure that you’re reaching the right people is a conversation,” Mantel says.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[Dolan-Backed 605 Eyes National TV Programmers With Analytics Solutions]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43365 2016-11-23T23:27:02Z 2016-11-23T12:08:40Z [...]]]> MIAMI – Lots of attention has been paid to data surrounding the two minutes of local television time that can be devoted to addressable advertising. But national programmers haven’t had access to this data bonanza, which is something that analytics provider 605 hopes to change.

The launch of 605 was announced on November 10 by Dolan Family Ventures at the same time that DFV said it had acquired Analytics Media Group, a pioneer in the use of set-top box data. In an interview with Beet.TV, 605 Co-Founder (along with CEO Kristin Dolan) and President Ben Tatta says the company will continue AMG’s work while branching out to assist TV programmers.

“Addressable was really focused on the two minutes of local time an hour and the national programmers really don’t necessarily have access to that because it’s been sold by the local cable systems,” Tatta says. “We think there’s also use and application of the data for curating programming and scheduling and getting better intelligence on how content should be distributed using this dataset.”

AMG’s work for certain clients has consisted largely of matching transactions against ad exposures to see which ads are the best performers. This involves processing “literally billions of records a week. It’s where the magic happens in terms of the real data crunching,” he says.

Turning its attention to programmers, 605 “is just scratching the surface on the applications beyond advertising,” but it envisions offering a full set of analytics solutions, Tatta explains in response to a question from interviewer Matt Spiegel of MediaLink. “Everything from tools and insights for the curation of programming, the marketing of programming to measuring things like tune in and tune in conversion, all the way to ad sales where this can be packaged for their own resale,” says Tatta.

The offerings will include ROI analytics programmers can show to their advertisers plus indexing of shows and networks based on audience composition.

Programmers have been “somewhat disenfranchised from all this data,” Tatta says.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[NBCUniversal Seeing ‘A Lot Of Uptake’ For Audience Targeting Platform]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43417 2016-11-23T23:25:08Z 2016-11-23T12:03:35Z [...]]]> MIAMI – As it builds out and scales up its Audience Targeting Platform, NBCUniversal is seeing big increases in budgets and clients taking advantage of more precise targeting via linear television. And while its various TV and digital targeting products are tied to specific platforms, the company is weaving the “connective fiber” that will create a more seamless process for advertisers.

Having launched ATP in the 2014-2015 Upfront negotiating period, NBCU began by guaranteeing audience delivery against traditional Nielsen age and gender metrics. In the 2016-2017 Upfront, it switched to guaranteeing delivery of specific audiences as defined by advertisers, according to Denise Colella, SVP of Advanced Advertising Products & Strategy.

“We’ve seen the amount of budgets that are getting optimized double and we’ve seen a tremendous increase in clients,” Colella says in an interview with Beet.TV. “And we’ve also seen almost all of the clients we had in year one come back for more.”

As The Wall Street Journal reports, NBCU has offered make-goods for campaigns that did not initially reach specific audience targets, meaning additional ad inventory within its portfolio of programming.

“It’s been somewhat of a limited release up until now,” Colella says in response to a question from interviewer Matt Spiegel, Managing Director of MediaLink. “We’re definitely seeing a lot of uptake.”

NBCU’s Audience Studio is composed of NBCUx and NBCUx for Linear TV, a programmatic offering across digital video, mobile and display platforms and linear television; NBCU+ Powered by Comcast, its addressable TV capability; and Social Synch, which helps extend advertisers’ and NBCUniversal’s social media content campaigns across major social platforms.

Segmenting audiences for individual advertisers has been a learning process, as it can be time consuming to help them define whom they want to target, according to Colella.

“Last year, we continued to guarantee against Nielsen because that’s what they were used to,” Colella says of NBCU’s advertiser clients. “Now that we’re seeing how this scales and the benefits that it’s providing to our advertisers, we’re standing behind the audiences that we’re promising and we know we can deliver them across our portfolio.”

Right now, Audience Studio products are “fairly siloed,” according to Colella, as they are limited to individual platforms.

“Over time, we’re building the connective fiber so that we can do that in a more seamless process,” she says. “That’s going to take some time.”

Meanwhile, buying practices also remain siloed to a certain extent. “The buying for addressable is typically in a separate group, a separate budget, than what we’re seeing for buying linear,” Colella says.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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Steve Ellwanger <![CDATA[Twitter Expects To Land More Advertisers While Becoming ‘Mature’ Video Platform]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=43452 2016-11-23T23:22:38Z 2016-11-22T21:06:48Z [...]]]> MIAMI – As it goes even deeper into live television streaming, Twitter is trying to make new advertisers feel comfortable with its platform. The effort includes Nielsen guarantees and measurement by Moat for third-party audience verification.

Twitter was a natural outlet for the National Football League, according to Ryan Moore, the company’s Global Agency Development Lead.

“The NFL comes to us because they say there’s a chunk of younger people that are just not watching as much TV. And they’re looking for international distribution as well,” Moore says in an interview with Beet.TV.

About 75% of people who stream NFL games on Twitter are under the age of 35, “So that’s the demographic that’s watching less and less TV,” Moore says.

For the recent political debates streamed live on Twitter, about 85% of viewers were under 35, according to Moore, who pegs advertising completion rates, with sound, at “about 98%. It’s going very well so far.”

Many advertisers that were quickest to get on board with Twitter’s live sports offerings had already been spending money on the platform. Asked by interviewer Matt Spiegel, Managing Director of MediaLink, to name some of those marketers, Moore says it runs the gamut.

“I think the ones that bite first are the ones who are our biggest partners already. They’re more willing to test. They already spend tens of millions of dollars if not more on the platform, so they’re comfortable with it,” Moore explains.

Perception is one of the keys to getting more companies to put their money down, as Twitter “starts to look at lot more like a video platform,” Moore notes. “You have advertisers who historically said I don’t do social or I don’t get Twitter,” he says. “But now that you can buy video on the platform in a way that looks a lot like everything else, that’s where we’re starting to see some of these new advertisers get on board.”

From a user perspective, Twitter plans to “go even deeper” into live TV, adding “some really cool stuff” on the screen alongside its streamed content.

On the marketer side, Twitter is using resources like Nielsen and Moat to make itself “look like a much more mature video platform so advertisers can start putting their money into these really exciting things while being comfortable with what’s coming out the other side,” says Moore.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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