Beet.TV The root to the media revolution 2015-03-31T01:02:13Z http://www.beet.tv/feed/atom WordPress Daisy Whitney <![CDATA[Media Agency of the Future is Based on Advisory Model, Interpublic CEO Michael Roth]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=32827 2015-03-31T01:02:13Z 2015-03-31T00:32:52Z Keep your head down, stay focused and be competitive. That’s the advice of media industry veteran Michael I Roth, Chairman and CEO of Interpublic in this interview on the changing nature of the advertising business.

“Don’t worry about this job, or someone else’s. Keep your head down and success will be recognized,” he says. “Always associate yourself with good people. If you are in an organization that is doing something wrong or has a work ethic you aren’t comfortable with.”

Roth comes to advertising from a non-traditional route. He’s the rare media agency CEO who didn’t cut his teeth on the copy desk or creative department. Instead, he moved into media management from the financial services side. He’s been guiding the shop for ten years now after having worked as a tax lawyer, an insurance executive and as an accountant back in his college days. He started at IPG on the board in 2002 and became CEO three years later.

Even in the short time he’s spent in the ad business, he’s witnessed tremendous change, wrought by the shift to digital, mobile and interactive consumer habits. As consumer attention becomes fractured across screens, the role of the agency morphs. “We are an advice model now. We have tech companies trying to gain market share but they are biased in favor of their platform and their tech. We are paid to advise clients on their best interests. We don’t have a vested interest in where we place media, or where we distirubte. That is the value we bring and the value of an integrated offering that is agnostic but has the expertise to understand the varied technologies.”

Data is fueling much of these changes. Roth has been an outspoken advocate of the need for sharing data freely across borders. As data becomes the “lifeblood” of the marketing economy, it’s vital for information to flow across the Internet, he has said. Earlier this quarter, he spoke about the overall growth of digital and how this sector is on track to exceed the TV ad spend in a few years. Acquisitions in digital and emerging markets are the foundation of IPG’s future growth, he has said.

More change is coming fast on the horizon. “The next five years will be exciting…but they will be very competitive. There are new players in our space and traditional advertising agencies have to change and embrace digital and keep their creativity.”

This is segment is part of Beet.TV’s “Media Revolutionaries,” a 50-part series of interviews with key innovators and leaders in the media, technology and advertising industries, sponsored by Xaxis and Microsoft. Xaxis is a unit of WPP. Roth was interviewed for Beet.TV by David J. Moore, Chairman of Xaxis and President of WPP Digital. The interview took place in January at the Wynnin Las Vegas during the Consumer Electronics Show.

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Mobile Video Ads Going Prime-Time: Opera Mediaworks CEO]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=32823 2015-03-30T15:43:50Z 2015-03-30T15:40:32Z AUSTIN — The online advertising world is fast moving from the medium screen to the small one. As it does, it can nevertheless recapture some of the advertising benefits boasted by the TV before them, says a mobile ad tech boss.

“Mobile is now the first screen,” Opera Mediaworks CEO Mahi de Silva tells Beet.TV in this video interview. “The desktop ad business started with banner ads… mobile is very unique – you can take over the screen and that user experience is like TV in the palm of your hand.

“Mobile video is the fastest-growing segment within mobile advertising. The same thing marketers love about your 60-inch screen in your living room, we make that happen on a smartphone or tablet.”

Da Silva said mobile video ads had to be brief, six- or eight-second videos that opened up in to full experiences upon user clicks, not 30-second spots shovelled from TV. But that places a new burden on creators. In January, Opera Mediaworks announced Native Video Fund, an initiative to financially assist the creation of mobile video ad campaigns in ways that uniquely fit mobile device demands.

Da Silva says mobile video represented over 50% of company revenue in 2014, up from 9% a year earlier.

Da Silva was interviewed by Beet.TV at the 4As’ (American Association of Advertising Agencies) Transformation 2015 event in Austin, Texas. Our coverage is sponsored by Videology.  Please find more coverage from the conference here.

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[CNN, the Economist, Financial Times, Reuters, the Guardian Join Programmatic “Coop” powered by the Rubicon Project, Jay Sears explains]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=32811 2015-03-30T11:31:23Z 2015-03-30T10:57:35Z AUSTIN — Earlier in March, The Guardian announced it was leading a coalition including CNN International, the Economist the Financial Times and Reuters to pool their ad inventory for programmatic international sale.

The exec whose company powers the so-called Pangea Alliance says such comings together, once considered rare in the cut-throat world of media, are beneficial.

“(In advertising), there’s always been that trade-off between scale and quality,” Rubicon Project marketplace development SVP Jay Sears tells Beet.TV. “Publishers are seeing Google and Facebook with the ability to provide that scale. With cooperative arrangements, they can do the same thing.

“By coming together, this group of media owners has created a global footprint of 110m monthly uniques that’s pretty significant in an environment that denotes quality.

“The phenomenon of the cooperative is something we’ve seen quite a bit of. You can see La Place in France, the Czech Publisher Exchange in the Czech Republic, the Danish Publisher Network in Denmark.”

These networks along with the Pangea are powered with technology from the Rubicon Project.

Sears was interviewed by Beet.TV at the 4As’ (American Association of Advertising Agencies) Transformation 2015 event in Austin, Texas. Our coverage is sponsored by Videology.  Please find more coverage from the conference here.

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Andy Plesser <![CDATA[Online Video Exploding Globally and Starcom’s Amanda Richman Explains Why]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=32799 2015-03-30T15:56:39Z 2015-03-30T00:48:16Z AUSTIN – Online video is showing dramatic growth.  It is by far the fastest growing ad medium.

In a closely watched quarterly report titled  Advertising Expenditure Forecasts, the big media agency ZenithOptimedia has just reported that online video grew last year at a blistering rate of 34% to $10.9 billion globally – and it is on track to double by the end of 2017.

In Austin last week, at the annual 4A’s conference, we sat down with Amanda Richman, President of Investment and Activation of Starcom USA.  She talks about the growth of the medium and its momentum from data, cross-screen consumption and by an increasing creative content creation process.

Our coverage is of the 4A’s summit was sponsored by Videology.  Please find more coverage from the conference here.

 

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[AOL CEO Armstrong Looks Ahead to a Consumer-Centric Economy]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=32793 2015-03-30T11:36:49Z 2015-03-27T23:53:38Z If you heard the economy was about to go in to “reverse”, you would probably be pretty worried. But consumers should actually welcome the coming era with open arms, according to AOL CEO Tim Armstrong – for, what he dubs “the reverse economy” will leave them richer.

“Corporations make a tremendous amount of profit from individual consumers giving their time, energy data and money,” Armstrong tells Beet.TV.

“The more that technology and the Internet Of Things comes in… you’re going to have the economics change a lot and the economy go in reverse… the individual consumer is going to get more benefit than corporations will get.”

Think of the classic Internet Of Things example – a fridge that knows what it needs to order. But extrapolate that idea to every conceivable consumer good.

“Instead of you going out to look for everything you need, those things will come to you – you’ll have a much better economic situation as a consumer,” Armstrong adds. “You’ll spend less time looking for things, you’ll get value from your own data. You’ll basically become more of your own profit center as a consumer. That’s a really big change. The economy’s going to come to the consumer.”

He postulates that this scenario will unfold in the next five or more years.

Armstrong is celebrating six years at the helm of AOL this month. That followed positions including running Google’s Americas business, directing sales at ABC/ESPN Internet Ventures and advising Greycroft Partners.

Armstrong has a knack for starting new ideas. The Connecticut College grad co-founded a newspaper in Boston and launched IDG’s first online magazine.

So how would he advise tomorrow’s generation to make its mark? Using three simple rules, he tells Beet.TV:

  1. “Take risks. Most people in life are taught not to take any risks. Every time you don’t feel like doing something, do it.”
  2. “Everyone is born with half the skillsets in life. You need to go out and find partners – whether it’s personal or professional – to give you the other half of your skillet.”
  3. “It’s a journey. It’s not about getting to be successful. You’re’ going to lead a long life. Take time to build relationships, take time to have friends.”

This interview is from Beet.TV’s “Media Revolutionaries”, a 50-part series of interviews with key innovators and leaders in the media, technology and advertising industries, sponsored by Xaxis and Microsoft.  Xaxis is a unit of WPP. Please find more clips from the series here.

Armstrong was interviewed for Beet.TV by David J. Moore, Chairman of Xaxis and President of WPP Digital.  The interview took place at the AOL headquarters in New York. 

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Daisy Whitney <![CDATA[Branded Content Key Focus of Digital Media, BoA Says]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=32786 2015-03-27T18:30:52Z 2015-03-27T18:30:52Z AUSTIN — Advertising has moved well beyond the thirteen-week cycles of the past and into branded content as the focus for the future, says Anne Finucane, Global Chief Strategy and Marketing Officer at Bank of America, in this interview with Beet.TV. “What’s here to stay is being able to tell a story with a beginning, middle and end with proof points that you can do in a thirty-second spot, or direct to customer with a web site, or Twitter, or Youtube,” she says.

Given that shift, it’s important to look at various metrics and brand goals for campaigns today. They might be brand lift or direct sales, but all can be impacted with this storytelling focus, she says, in explaining how brands and agencies can work together more effectively. “You don’t have to tell the story in full in each medium, but to collectivey tell it across mediums,” Finucane says. “As a brand, you have to develop a purpose, positioning and proof point, but the way to execute is different.”

Finucane was interviewed by Beet.TV at the 4As’ (American Association of Advertising = Agencies) Transformation 2015 event in Austin. Our coverage is sponsored by Videology.  Please find more coverage from the conference here.

 

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Daisy Whitney <![CDATA[Ogilvy’s Shelly Lazarus on Long-Term Career Success]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=32775 2015-03-27T11:39:55Z 2015-03-27T01:23:50Z When advertising veteran Shelly Lazarus began her career more then 40 years ago, marketers dreamed then about truly being able to communicate one to one with customers. Now, that’s a reality and presents an enormous opportunity for the industry and those leading the digital charge.

“When I was working in direct marketing we used to imagine what it was like if we could talk to an individual in real time and tell that person about our product and service, and everything we did was to simulate what that would feel like,” says Shelly Lazarus, Chairman Emeritus of Ogilvy & Mather in this interview with Beet.TV. “Now we can. We are just in the infancy in the industry of trying to figure out how to use the ability to talk one to one in the moment a consumers indicates he or she is interested in what we have to sell.”

Those changes in the technological capabilities of the digital world are making advertising a more fascinating playground for those entering the field today. “Over the next five to ten years, we are going to have more ways of consuming content than has ever been imagined, and as a starting point we are all going to have to be agnostic about how an individual wants to consume content. They are going to have so many choices and we have to accept it.”

Lazarus has a particular vantage point from having been with the storied shop since 1971, and having led the agency during the 1990s and into the 2000s. Advertising was a natural fit for Lazarus since she responded to the creativity as well as the particular type of people that the field attracts.

“If you want to wake up every morning and have the world be different in a way where you have to figure out what to do in it, this is a great industry. And it’s the people in it. Working all day with creative people is a treat,” she says in explaining her passion for the business. “I also find people in advertising very involved in culture and what is happening in the world, so you have these interesting, funny, outrageous people who you get to think with every day and come up with new solutions…it has never felt like work to me.”

Lazarus has talked openly about “personal branding” and what it means and shouldn’t mean in the context of a career in advertising. “Resilience —the ability to hang in there when things are difficult—is critical in a career, and if you’re spending every hour of the day pretending to be someone you’re not, you’ll be exhausted and won’t have the energy needed to face your real work,” she said in an interview with the Harvard Business Review on this topic.

Perhaps that’s why she’s such an outspoken advocate of working in a field one loves. “Find something you love to do. Find something about which you are passionate,” she tells Beet.TV. “If it’s not advertising, don’t stay here. If you don’t like what you’re doing, go find something you love. You’re never going to give enough of yourself to something unless you love it. And unless you give freely of yourself, you’re not going to be successful.”

This is segment is part of Beet.TV’s “Media Revolutionaries,” a 50-part series of interviews with key innovators and leaders in the media, technology and advertising industries, sponsored by Xaxis and Microsoft. Xaxis is a unit of WPP. Lazarus was interviewed for Beet.TV by David J. Moore, Chairman of Xaxis and President of WPP Digital.

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Daisy Whitney <![CDATA[Horizon CEO Koenigsberg on the Transformation of the Media Agency]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=32761 2015-03-26T11:14:24Z 2015-03-26T00:31:30Z AUSTIN — The new media agency of the future needs a “white canvas mindset” says Bill Koenigsberg, President and CEO of Horizon Media, in this interview with Beet.TV. “With the way the world is changing so fast, each day you need to come in and paint a new picture. You have to keep painting to move the business forward,” he says.

In addition, agencies need to focus on inventing for the future and on hiring the right people for the new ways of marketing. “We are bringing in data analytics people, creative technologists, and behavioral scientists into our business. We are bringing in all kinds of new skill sets to navigate, paint, invent and create,” he says. Koenisberg also discusses the changes in creative needs and approaches, given the shifting dynamics in media, content, and storytelling.

He is the chairman of the 4A’s.  Horizon is the largest privately-owned media agency in the world.

Bill Koenigsberg was interviewed by Beet.TV at the 4As’ (American Association of Advertising Agencies) Transformation 2015 event in Austin. Our coverage is sponsored by Videology.  Please find more coverage from the conference here.

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Daisy Whitney <![CDATA[Starcom’s CEO Donohue & “New Establishment” Brand Airbnb]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=32749 2015-03-25T23:55:42Z 2015-03-25T23:52:44Z AUSTIN — One of the benefits of working with “new establishment brands” is they come to media planning without any baggage attached to them that iconic marketers often have to deal with, says Lisa Donohue, CEO at Starcom USA, in this interview with Beet.TV. As an example, she points to rental and hospitaly site, Airbnb, a new Starcom client, that embodies this type of modern brand.

“Given that the world is changing rapidly, the benefit is that they have no status to break, only rules to rewrite,” she says. The best way for an agency to help to build these type of brands is to be quick, agile, and in sync with who they are as a brand. “We immersed ourselves with them as a company. We set up shop at their offices and met everyone at Airbnb to truly understand the ethos of the company and how they operate.”

Starcom’s focus with this client has been centered around content creation and storytelling, rather than on flowcharts detailing reach and frequency, she says. More established brands can learn from these upstarts about how to be more agile and not be controlled by process, while newer brands can benefit by embracing process more, she says in explaining what newer and established brands can learn from each other.

Donohoue was interviewed by Beet.TV at the 4As’ (American Association of Advertising Agencies) Transformation 2015 event in Austin. Our coverage is sponsored by Videology.  Please find more coverage from the conference here.

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Robert Andrews <![CDATA[Can The HuffPost Show Fill Colbert’s Gap, All The Way To Cable?]]> http://www.beet.tv/?p=32750 2015-03-26T13:02:06Z 2015-03-25T22:46:49Z AUSTIN — With two of broadcast TV’s satirical news-meisters heading to pastures new this year, is online video yet in a position to move in and occupy the space? We may find out on April 3.

That’s when Huffington Post launches The HuffPost Show – but, in time, the online media brand wants to get its shows on the living room TV.

“It will be a satirical news show. It will be our take on those type of shows. It’s shot in front of a live audience, live to air, it is very exciting for us,” Huffington Post CEO Jimmy Maymann tells Beet.TV of the weekly show, airing 9 p.m. ET/6 p.m. PT beginning April 3.

With two of TV’s main satirical shows, The Colbert Report and The Daily Show, losing their hosts, it is certainly good timing. Maymann comments: “We planned that a long time (ago), but, since then, it’s helping us that Colbert has decided to do something else, John Stewart just announced that he wants to do something else. It feels like the timing couldn’t have been better.”

Huffington Post is no longer simply the blog launched by its eponymous founder. The HuffPost Live brand has already built muscle memory at creating daily live and recorded video casts on topical events. But HuffPost and Maymann have designs on more than just their own online channel.

“The next frontier for us is to see, is there a deal for us that can be done in cable?,” he says.
“Things like the HuffPost Show, but also we’re planning a numbers of documentaries coming later this year.

“A numbers of those things would have a natural life on a more traditional cable channel.
That’s the hope.”

Whether cable operators agree, time will tell.

Maymann was interviewed by Beet.TV at the 4As’ (American Association of Advertising Agencies) Transformation 2015 event in Austin, Texas. Our coverage is sponsored by Videology.  Please find more coverage from the conference here.

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