Beet.TV https://www.beet.tv The root to the media revolution Wed, 26 Apr 2017 13:28:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.4 NBCUniversal’s Bhatia: ‘Broad Swath’ Of Industry Categories Opt For Audience Guarantees https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/krishan-bhatia.html Wed, 26 Apr 2017 13:28:22 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45559 [...]]]> Having set aside $1 billion in inventory for non-Nielsen audience guarantees during this year’s TV Upfront, NBCUniversal has seen demand for its audience targeting products double year over year. Although it’s a big commitment, market dynamics are in the company’s favor.

“The reason we’re continuing to be confident about increases in demand is because we’re seeing it come from a broad swath of industry categories,” including automotive, consumer packaged-goods, financial services, travel and leisure and retail, says EVP of Business Operations & Strategy Krishan Bhatia.

Its audience targeting and programmatic offerings are now always on—available in the Upfront and scatter—enabling advertisers to access NBCU inventory “across a number of DMP’s that we’ll be expanding as well,” Bhatia says in this interview with Beet.TV.

NBCU recently introduced a new division called Audience Studio, which The Wall Street Journal reports is dedicated to helping marketers employ data for ad targeting purposes by tying together four of the company’s ad buying products.

Asked whether NBCU will be joining forces with Fox, Turner and Viacom in their OpenAP audience buying consortium, Bhatia expresses support for the endeavor while underscoring the company’s own efforts to help advertisers target audiences beyond traditional Nielsen demographics.

Then there is the reach of the NBCU portfolio. Its scale approximates “95% of total viewership reach in the United states, which is about the same amount that I believe the OpenAP initiative announced,” Bhatia says.

Nonetheless, he says the media giant is “generally supportive of any efforts that help the TV ecosystem go above and beyond the traditional age/gender based way of measuring and transacting on audiences, including this one,” a reference to OpenAP.

At the urging of NBCU and others, Nielsen recently put off the release of its Total Content Ratings, so it’s not a factor in the 2017 Upfront negotiations. In the meantime, NBCU has been investing in alternative solutions with both established companies in the space and newcomers.

“Historically, measurement has never really been fully caught up with where consumer trends are headed, and I think we’ve only seen that accelerate as viewership and content distribution continue to fragment,” Bhatia says. “I’m not sure that measurement will ever quite frankly ever be fully caught up.”

This segment is part of a series leading up to the 2017 TV Upfront. It is presented by FreeWheel. To find more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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Unified Disney Sales Offers ‘Something For All Life Stages,’ Says O’Connell https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/debra-oconnell.html Wed, 26 Apr 2017 06:00:48 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45613 [...]]]> Shortly before the 2017 TV Upfront began, Disney unified the way it sells ABC, Freeform and its Disney entertainment cable networks to advertisers. If only the advertising/media industry could coalesce around standardized cross-platform audience measurement.

Like other media executives whose content is distributed on an ever-increasing number of platforms, Debra O’Connell “would like to see it move faster. We continue to help drive that discussion” about cross-platform measurement.

In the meantime, Disney has made it easier for advertisers to avail themselves of opportunities across a content portfolio that offers “something for all life stages,” the EVP of Sales & Marketing for ABC Television Group says in this interview with Beet.TV.

While ESPN maintains a separate sales organization, as Variety reports, “When clients want us to work together or we have a great opportunity to align both groups we will continue to work together,” says O’Connell. “Actually, having Disney ABC sales as one portfolio makes that streamlining even easier.”

Disney was an early proponent of enabling brands to target desired audiences beyond traditional Nielsen age/sex demographics. “There’s absolutely an appetite for it,” she says. The company’s recommendation for many advertisers is a balance of branding at scale and targeting a particular audience segment “for a particular solution that they’re looking for or key performance indicator that they’d like to see as a return on investment for that campaign.”

She believes the industry is “not quite half way there” on uniform cross-platform measurement but that in the next five years there will be more than one option.

Having a few measurement solutions “as opposed to just one individual monopoly” would provide variety while maintaining “some kind of standardization of what that measurement needs to look like” to provide a true picture of audience and viewership.

This segment is part of a series leading up to the 2017 TV Upfront. It is presented by FreeWheel. To find more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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The Pros And Cons Of Upfront TV Ad Sales: Initiative’s Bosetti https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/ufinitiativebosetti.html Tue, 25 Apr 2017 13:28:34 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45544 [...]]]> We are right in the middle of the upfronts, the spring season in which TV networks and publishers tout their upcoming content roster to secure upfront committed advertiser spend.

But what do brands get out of the upfronts? One woman who guides advertisers through their upfront buying strategy says there are both pros and cons involved in their approach.

“There is a myriad of factors that we consider when we are trying to guide clients in terms of whether or not to be in the upfront marketplace,” says Maureen Bosetti, chief investment officer at IPG Mediabrands’ Initiative.

Amongst the variables involved in the strategy:

  • Brands’ aims
  • Budget
  • Preferred period for airing
  • Demographics sought
  • Competitor activity

And Bosetti says the whole season can be advantageous on at least one of those factors: “The upfront is great to make sure you can buy large amounts of television at scale … At the most efficient pricing.”

But, she acknowledges, spending committed early can limit a brand’s ability to respond later in the fall.

“Disadvantages to being in the upfront could include things like less flexibility, you are committed to the dollars, you may not be able to have funds left for more opportunistic things that come along throughout the year,” she adds.

How will networks fare during this year’s upfronts? Wall Street analysts’ forecasts are split.

“(Jefferies’ John) Janedis sees a 2% decline in the upfront dollars spent on TV to $18.2 billion, with broadcasters down 3% and cable down 1%,” reports Deadline.

But BMO Capital Markets’ Daniel Salmon expects new data-driven targeting offers brought by networks to bring growth, Deadline reports. “Does this sound like a dying marketplace to you?” he asks. “No, us either.”

This segment is part of a series leading up to the 2017 TV Upfront. It is presented by FreeWheel. To find more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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Speciale: Turner Sees Ad Reduction Ratings Lift, Expects More OpenAP Members https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/donna-speciale-3.html Tue, 25 Apr 2017 13:08:49 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45591 [...]]]> After reducing the ad load in some of its programming on truTV and TNT, Turner has seen a corresponding ratings lift while seeking to bring more native ads to television as a complement to the ad reduction. And in this interview with Beet.TV during the 2017 TV Upfront, Ad Sales President Donna Speciale says she expects more media companies will be joining the Fox-Turner-Viacom audience targeting OpenAP.

“We’ve seen ratings lifts in both areas,” Speciale says of the truTV and TNT ad reduction efforts, along with “increased brand affinity to the messages that have been within those pods.” Specifically, she says C3 ratings—which track average commercial minutes in live programming plus total playback by digital video recorder out to three days after—was “probably anywhere from five to seven to ten percent lift,” depending on the programming.

“It’s going to be continuing. truTV might be adding some more of their programming with LCI and there are going to be more originals on TNT in 2018 where you’re going to be seeing reduced commercial load,” says Speciale.

On the native ad front, Turner has been asking clients to take some of the one- to two-minute messaging they’ve done in the digital space and bring it to TV. In addition, its content studio has been marrying Turner’s talent ranks with ad messaging and environments. “And that’s going to have a huge pop and resonate really well with the consumer right now.”

Turner uses its targeting capabilities to find the right placement for native content across its entire portfolio, as Advertising Age reports.

According to Speciale, OpenAP was a direct response to clients “asking us to get together.” Even though the individual member networks had focused on their own audience targeting capabilities, “Some of the comments have been ‘it’s great but it’s a little complicated, it’s not scalable. Would you guys consider coming together?’”

She believes the consortium will be a “catalyst” to spur more advertiser interest in audience targeting using their own data sets during this year’s TV Upfront.

“We have been getting a lot of response from other media companies and we are hoping shortly that we’ll be able to announce other people joining the consortium,” Speciale says.

This segment is part of a series leading up to the 2017 TV Upfront. It is presented by FreeWheel. To find more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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UM’s Hill On The Evolutionary Pressures Reshaping The Television Market https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/tim-hill.html Mon, 24 Apr 2017 12:33:48 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45574 [...]]]> There might not be anything revolutionary per se about the 2017 TV Upfront, but that’s not to suggest there aren’t a variety of evolutionary forces reshaping the competitive landscape. They range from competitive pressure to build out dynamic ad insertion capabilities to offering more precise audience targeting and ensuring brand-safe digital ad environments.

These are some of the trends that Tim Hill sees when he views the TV Upfront with the perspective of nearly 17 years at UM. Now EVP, Managing Partner, Integrated Investment, he shares his thoughts on a range of issues affecting buyers and sellers in this interview with Beet.TV.

It’s no secret that more advertisers would like to achieve more one-to-one messaging by being able to serve the most appropriate ads at a given moment via dynamic ad insertion. “The technology exists to do that. The problem has always been the scale of how you get there,” Hill says.

He finds it promising that video-on-demand providers from Hulu to DIRECTV NOW and others are providing more inventory for dynamic ad insertion, pressuring affiliates and MSO’s to get on board as well. “I think what we’re going to have to see is the traditional players in the space having to set up that dynamic ad insertion environment because they’re being challenged by people who are building that from the ground up,” says Hill.

While the desire for dynamic ad insertion varies client to client, it’s “powerful on the seller end” because it can make their inventory much more efficient, according to Hill.

In every TV Upfront, certain topics rise to the top of industry conversations, pushed there by competitive forces. This year those topics include the new audience targeting consortium by Fox, Turner and Viacom called OpenAP, along with brand-safe digital ad placements.

TV networks will use brand safety issues to tout their inventory control while downplaying the disadvantages of audience migration to a host of competitive platforms. “So while they control their inventory sourcing, they’re losing audience just in general to the marketplace,” Hill says.

He believes the talk about safe environments is a good thing for the industry because “people are going to have to come out stronger and put more accountability against this.”

This segment is part of a series leading up to the 2017 TV Upfront. It is presented by FreeWheel. To find more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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Starcom’s Richman Welcomes TV Networks’ Data Plays https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/ufstarcomrichman.html Mon, 24 Apr 2017 12:25:19 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45543 [...]]]> Moves by big US TV networks to guarantee TV ads targeted at specific audiences using data beyond mere demographics have been welcomed by a major media agency.

Several of the big US TV networks have declared they will make moves to let advertising buyers use granular and first-party viewer data, over and above traditional Nielsen data, to target ads on linear TV to guaranteed audiences.

The recent announcements included:

  • Fox, Viacom and Turner teamed to form OpenAP, a system in which they will allow ad buyers to define audience segments that are targetable across the networks, not just individually.
  • NBC plans to sell $1bn of its upfront inventory through its own Audience Targeting Platform.
  • A+E is selling more guaranteed ads against audiences of its shows using its Precision platform

Speaking with Beet.TV in this video interview, Starcom USA investment and activation president Amanda Richman welcomed the moves.

“The networks leaning in to their audience optimisation products … demonstrates that they are committed to understanding we do need more precise targeting, we are pushing harder for more granular measurement,” she said.

“Doing that in premium environments is certainly welcome.

“Much of the targeting and optimisation that’s been happening in digital can now been brought in to the television space.”

Richman also observes an “explosion of content” presenting “new opportunities for us to find that audience in different spaces”, including the possibility of shorter and more interactive TV ad formats.

This segment is part of a series leading up to the 2017 TV Upfront. It is presented by FreeWheel. To find more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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Target’s Argyilan On The Changing Value Of TV https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/uftargetargyilan.html Sun, 23 Apr 2017 19:17:40 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45542 [...]]]> Only one company spent more on US TV ads during the winter holidays, according to iSpot.TV – but Target is still looking for the box in the corner of the living room to prove its worth.

One of the retail giant’s  top execs says TV is still performing for the chain – but that doesn’t mean times are not changing.

“We continue to see a reasonably healthy television marketplace,” Target marketing SVP Kristi Argyilan tells Beet.TV in this video interview. “We see, in our data, plenty of evidence that our guests are still watching a lot of television.

“But we do see it diminishing a little bit every year … to the mobile phone. We will be following those changes in behavior.”

What does that following look like? For Target, it means a combination of partnering with digital ad companies, reviewing where best to spent traditional TV money and commission creative for new screens.

“We are trying to assign value to all television at this point – there’s a long tail when you consider all the inventory sitting in cable, in particular,” Argyilan adds. “Where is the programming that’s really valuable?”

She says a combination of Target’s own studio, in-house creative department, an Indian creative outpost and its creative agency suppliers are tasked with making new-style ads for a plethora of new platforms.

“We’re able to hit at all levels and altitudes and to create the amount of content that we need,” she says. “We’re still working on the pipes to distribute the content faster.”

This segment is part of a series leading up to the 2017 TV Upfront. It is presented by FreeWheel. To find more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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Live Video And Living Room Viewing Are Premium Growth Areas: FreeWheel’s Lawlor https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/mike-lawlor-2.html Sun, 23 Apr 2017 19:11:38 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45551 [...]]]> If premium video providers need a promotional tagline to summarize their current world, it could well be “Coming to you live on your living room television.” That’s because two of the biggest takeaways from the FreeWheel Video Monetization Report (VMR): Q4 2016 are a big uptick in live and simulcast viewing and a migration of viewing from computers and devices to TV screens.

For premium video overall, it’s been six years of double-digit growth in both ad and video views, Mike Lawlor, FreeWheel’s SVP of Client Services, explains in this interview with Beet.TV. “Live video is really starting to take off in terms of ad views,” says Lawlor.

The FreeWheel VMR reveals a migration over the past few years from viewing happening predominantly on desktop and laptop computers—largely a function of distribution—to mobile devices and, finally, the living room. “Set-top VOD and OTT is our strongest growth story and something we’re really excited about. For the first year, it’s the biggest category,” he says, noting that 41% of ad views happened in the living room environment.

As viewership continues to congregate in living rooms, live and simulcasted events have been on the upswing, as has advertiser use of digital dynamic ad insertion. “It’s a natural evolution that we’re seeing more and more dynamic ad insertion activated on live environments and we expect that to continue.”

Asked about the impact of publicity surrounding a backlash by some advertisers to their ads appearing alongside objectionable content, Lawlor says that while it’s the story of the day, it’s nothing new to FreeWheel’s clients. “That’s because premium programmers have had their eye on the user experience for a very long time. This isn’t new to them. Premium programmers in this ecosystem have ensured that they’re developing and maintaining well-lit environments with content that is premium in nature and is safe for advertisers to have their messaging next to. ”

While there are frequent calls within advertising and media circles for a uniform way of targeting people across devices while measuring engagement and campaign ROI, FreeWheel doesn’t believe there will ever be a “single source of truth” as has long been the case with linear TV.

“Marketers intend for their campaigns to do different things on different screens,” he says, ranging from viewability and attribution to brand outcomes. “I think what’s most important is that we enable the ecosystem to target on and measure by whatever’s relevant to the buyers, and a lot of the work we’re doing at FreeWheel is to ensure that we have that capability.”

This segment is part of a series leading up to the 2017 TV Upfront. It is presented by FreeWheel. To find more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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MediaLink’s Millard Welcomes Audience Buying, More Brand Safety https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/wenda-millard.html Thu, 20 Apr 2017 17:04:12 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45536 [...]]]> Buying television based on audiences as opposed to programming is a welcome evolution to media veteran Wenda Harris Millard. And while the term “quality programming” is in the eye of the beholder, she thinks marketers have every right to know exactly where their ads are running.

“I’ve been in the business for a long time. I never thought that demographics made a lot of sense when we were talking about broad demographics, like women 18-54,” the Vice Chairman of strategic advisory and business development firm MediaLink says in this interview with Beet.TV. “I think this notion of demographics has never made a lot of sense in many, many categories,” she adds. “I’m glad to see if fading off a little bit.”

Selling TV time by audience instead of by “literal programming” makes a lot of sense to Millard. It’s part of the evolution of the business and how people are approaching “intelligent media buying and spending. So I’m a big fan of the evolution.”

One trend she observes is programmers taking an integrated approach to this year’s TV Upfront season. “I would say most of the companies are selling online video, mobile video with their classic television.”

On the headline-grabbing issue of brand safety, trust and the reliability of media, Millard says it’s a conversation that is front and center once again. While the quality of the programming “is anybody’s opinion,” brands are justified in their expectation to know their ads are running where they want them to run, particularly in digital.

“That’s not a lot to ask, but that conversation is critical at this moment when the black box of some of the operators in digital is still out there,” says Millard.

Millard Moving to London in MediaLink Expansion

Following MediaLink’s recent acquisition by Ascential plc, Millard has just been tapped to run MediaLink’s first office outside of the United States, in London.

“This is a clear step to fast-track MediaLink’s business and further increase its presence outside the U.S.,” Ascential Chief Executive Duncan Painter said in a news release. “We are continuing to develop synergies between MediaLink and our other businesses to better serve our customers and bring additional elements to our growth strategy.”

This segment is part of a series leading up to the 2017 TV Upfront. It is presented by FreeWheel. To find more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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Brand Content Not Just ‘Nice To Have’ But The Future Of Marketing: DigitasLBi’s Donaton https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/scott-donaton-2.html Thu, 20 Apr 2017 14:15:49 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45439 [...]]]> LOS ANGELES – In an age of advertising as storytelling, it starts with deciding what stories to tell that are worthy of an audience’s time. The next part is what gets tricky, namely figuring out the best places and ways to tell those stories.

As much as some brands might wish to create a particular message once and then chop it up and distribute it across multiple platforms, “You just can’t. You have to understand what platforms people are using for what reasons,” says Scott Donaton, Chief Content Officer at DigitasLBi.

This requires an understanding of why people frequent Snapchat as opposed to Facebook or watching a television show. “You really have to think about what is the user coming to this platform for and then what’s the best way to tell that story on that platform,” Donaton says in this interview with Beet.TV at the 2017 Transformation conference of the 4A’s.

A lot of brands “do get a little nervous” about having to create various messaging and then how to scale it all. “But it’s not as intimidating once you actually embrace it as it might seem to be,” Donaton adds.

Branded content has evolved from something that was once nice to have to a must have for marketers. It’s no longer something experimental “that you dip your toe in but that it really is the future of marketing.”

By way of illustration, Donaton says DigitasLBi doesn’t have a client that in the last 18 months hasn’t asked for a content marketing strategy. “We’re also starting to see a lot of brands like Mattel, Pepsi and Marriott follow in the heels of brands like Red Bull and GE and become really deeply committed to this idea of storytelling and investing heavily in it,” says Donaton. “And I think that’s just going to continue.”

With the 2017 NewFronts season on the near horizon, DigitasLBi marks a 10-year anniversary, having birthed the annual ritual initially as a half-day event for its clients. The agency’s message to brands was before you commit all your money in the television Upfronts, take a closer look at digital content.

“We’ve gone from that half-day Digitas-only event into a two-week, multi-billion-dollar marketplace where every major digital player is out there being a part of that conversation,” Donaton says.

This video is part of series produced in Los Angeles at the 4A’s Transformation ’17. The series is sponsored by Extreme Reach. For more videos from the conference, please visit this page.

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Tapad’s O’Loughlin Targets Humans Using Diverse Data https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/174atapadoloughlin.html Thu, 20 Apr 2017 14:04:46 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45421 [...]]]> LOS ANGELES — Trying to target an individual consumer when people’s breadcrumb trails are scattered across a plethora of devices feels like a headache for many marketers today – but those data trails can be united to piece people back together.

Started seven years ago, Tapad was one of the first of what is now a rash of vendors claiming to do just that – it has even trademarked the term “the device graph” to describe this cross-device consumer profile.

Speaking in this video interview with Beet.TV, Tapad media business SVP and GM Kate O’Loughlin explains the concept and the necessity behind the approach.

“If you were to only know the audience of a person from just their other TV, digital TV consumption behaviour, you would have an incomplete view of the consumer’s audience,” she says.

“If you know better that this person has these interests, these actions, these behaviours on their phone, and … from their computer, next to what they’re consuming on television, you have a much more clear understanding of who this human is, a more well-rounded understanding of the audience, so you can be much more precise when you do make these (advertising) buys.

Tapad became one of the many ad-tech players to be acquired by a telecom operator in 2016 when it was bought out by Scandinavian Telenor.

The company just released a white paper explaining the Viewable Exposure Time, a new metric it invented last year.

This video is part of series produced in Los Angeles at the 4A’s Transformation ’17. The series is sponsored by Extreme Reach. For more videos from the conference, please visit this page.

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Omnicom’s Geraci Surveys The Upfront Landscape, OpenAP Consortium https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/chris-geraci-3.html Thu, 20 Apr 2017 00:01:50 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45507 [...]]]> Given supply and demand dynamics amid shrinking television ratings, it still makes sense for brands with big TV budgets to participate in the annual Upfront negotiating ritual. Unlike last year, the President of National Video Investment for OMD USA doesn’t foresee significant price inflation this time around.

“By and large, if you have a sizable amount of advertising dollars to spend in national television we try and get you into the Upfront, because history has proven it’s an advantageous position to be in,” Chris Geraci says in this interview with Beet.TV.

For a variety of reasons, some advertisers can’t make a long-term commitment for TV inventory. In those cases, Omnicom tries to structure shorter, multi-quarter deals if possible, according to Geraci.

Even with the arrival of digital publishers and their inventory, giving brands more choices of where to run their ads, supply and demand still dictates pricing during the Upfront. This is particularly the case when audience fragmentation and audience losses ultimately impact the available supply of gross ratings points.

“We actually saw a little bit of growth in last year’s Upfront in terms of advertiser spending,” Geraci says. “That combined with what was a pretty horrendous year in terms of ratings performance certainly produced a significant amount of inflation.”

He doesn’t expect to see similar TV budget growth in 2017, “But inflation is part of the deal when you’re talking about a supply and demand environment.”

Advertiser demand for better audience targeting beyond traditional age/sex demographics spawned the recently announced OpenAP consortium involving Fox, Turner and Viacom. Geraci describes the move as be “great” because it provides a uniform metric in the advanced targeting arena.

Asked if he expects to see more programmers join OpenAP, he doesn’t see why others would not. “You’re basically offering something to the agency and advertiser community that is going to be simpler to use, it will be easier to make comparisons,” Geraci says. “I don’t really know what the downside would be of not being part of it.”

When the subject turns to the continued emergence of brand-safe environments for video ads, he believes it’s going to be “shouted from the mountaintops” during the Upfront season. But he offers perspective as well.

“I think that there are still plenty of places in the online world where brand safety can be all but ensured,” Geraci says. “We’re talking about a very specific problem dealing with what is, for the most part, user-generated, non-professional content that has always been an obvious concern.”

This segment is part of a series leading up to the 2017 TV Upfront.  It is presented by FreeWheel.   To find more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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Bought By Oracle, Goodhart’s Moat Takes Ad-Tech To TV Upfront https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/17moatgoodhart.html Wed, 19 Apr 2017 22:05:49 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45502 [...]]]> When people think of advertising analytics vendors that offer an insight in to the viewability of ad inventory, Moat is often top of most minds. Now it is also part of one of the biggest IT companies on the planet.

New York-based Moat, founded seven years ago, has signed an agreement to be acquired by Oracle in what will be one of the biggest examples yet of marketing technology companies acquiring in to ad-tech.

And now Moat is taking its viewability technology in to the upfronts, the season in which US TV networks tout their upcoming content in order to sell to advertisers.

Speaking in this video interview with Beet.TV, Moat CEO Jonah Goodhart revealed Fox, through its true[X] ad engagement subsidiary, will be trying to sell advertisers based on “attention” as measured through a Moat partnership.

“We’re specifically doing something with Fox, coming up for this year’s upfronts, where they are really focused on attention, on how to understand … attention in television, connected TV, other types of environments,” he said.

“We are Fox’s partner where we start with measuring viewability, moving on to time and ultimately asking questions like, ‘How long was somebody there? What did they do?’, ‘Did they interact with the ad?’ [and] ’Did they choose do be there?… ‘

“With Fox, we’re applying [our] technology to understand attention in the environments they create.” Fox’s upfront presentation takes place on May 15.

It comes as Moat’s acquisition by Oracle serves as another indicator of ad-tech consolidation, after TubeMogul was acquired by Adobe late in 2016.

Moat’s product suite includes online analytics for advertising, including insight in to the visibility of video advertising. Oracle plans to integrate the company in to its existing Oracle Data Cloud – a suite for targeting, delivering and measuring online advertising which claims to have over five billion unique consumer profiles.

Oracle has bought in to ad-tech in recent years through Bluekai and Vitrue. It says Moat “will remain an independent platform within” its own offering.

Moat’s star has risen as concern has grown over the extent of fraudulent ad impressions and inventory that is not even viewable by human users, and especially since the Media Ratings Council (MRC) codified guidelines for viewable ad impressions as a consequence in 2014. Now the company claims over 600 clients.

In a letter to its customers, Oracle says:

“Oracle plans to continue investing in Moat. We expect this will include more functionality and capabilities at a quicker pace. In addition, Moat customers will benefit from better integration and alignment with Oracle’s other product offerings.

“Oracle and Moat are committed to keeping Moat an open measurement and analytics platform, with deep integrations and partnerships across the entire digital publisher and adtech landscape.”

Oracle claims media spending worth more than $4bn was enhanced by capabilities of its Data Cloud last year.

Update:  Peter Kafka reports in recode that Oracle is paying over $850 million for the acquisition.

This segment is part of a series leading up to the 2017 TV Upfront.  It is presented by FreeWheel.   To find more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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Predicting Human Behavior ‘Scary And Exciting’ To Starcom’s Stopulos https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/stephanie-stopulos.html Wed, 19 Apr 2017 19:17:43 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45513 [...]]]> LOS ANGELES – People are unpredictable and messy, so understanding what drives their purchase decisions is truly a work in progress despite oceans of data. Then there are machines like Alexa and Siri, who are slowly nudging humans from the decisioning process.

But these realities are what excite Stephanie Stopulos, the SVP of Advanced Analytics & Insights at Starcom USA. And she can’t wait to start influencing the “machine ladies.”

In this interview with Beet.TV at the annual Transformation conference of the 4A’s, Stopulos says the biggest challenge facing marketers today is engaging with consumers via multiple screens in ways that try to predict the unpredictable.

“Consumer journeys are interesting. Marketing models are helpful. But at the end of the day you never quite know how someone is going to make a decision,” says Stopulos. “People are unpredictable and they are messy.”

Trying to divine a peoples’ true desire line and connect what they want to what brands need is an opportunity that’s “both scary and exciting at the same time.” She feels that the biggest challenge in tying together a cohesive story is making sure that “you have a set of luggage that isn’t too matching, and appropriate for that environment.”

One example is food content, which on platforms like Pinterest and Snapchat needs to be very different to break through than it does with a mass delivered audience like television. “Thinking about that in ways that are flexible and take into account marketers’ realities within non-working budgets is a very real challenge,” says Stopulos.

She finds it most reassuring that more chief marketing officers are recognizing the value of and embracing their own data and evangelizing it as part of their organizations. “They’re mining it more effectively.”

And she’s ready to wade into the realm of machine learning to see where it leads.

“I can’t wait to get the first brief that says my audience for a campaign is Alexa and Siri. Those are the ladies that are really powering the decisions of the future,” Stopulos says. “Mom will always be important in a lot of households, but Alexa and Siri are coming right after her.”

This video is part of series produced in Los Angeles at the 4A’s Transformation ’17. The series is sponsored by Extreme Reach. For more videos from the conference, please visit this page.

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Better Data Leads To Better Ads, Less Complex Media Ecosystem: Publicis’ Shlachter https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/adam-shlachter-3.html Wed, 19 Apr 2017 19:01:06 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45485 [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR – The transformative power of data is about much more than just being able to target audiences with more precision and relevance. Data also has the power to cure many digital ecosystem ills.

“Data is paramount to every strategy we put together with our clients, with our partners. It’s sort of the universal language that we have not just to transact on necessarily but to plan against,” says Adam Shlachter, President of Global Innovation at Publicis Media.

This language translates into understanding people as people, not just as broad-based segments to be traded on or targeted against. Tapping into mindsets and behaviors while grasping the effect of ad environments can unleash many useful changes.

“We can create better ads, we can certainly create better experiences and over time we can probably eliminate a lot of the waste that exists today,” Shlachter says in this interview at the 2017 Beet.TV Executive Retreat.

That wastes derives from a lack of transparency, lack of connectivity and “quite frankly an overly complex media ecosystem that is not as connected as we’d like it to be.”

It’s been just over a year since Publicis Groupe began to transform its media operations, eliminating some divisions while merging agencies, as The Wall Street Journal reports. From a central perspective, the realignment facilitates greater intelligence sharing while providing better access to talent, resources and technology, according to Shlachter.

“I do believe that these transformations take more time,” he says. “You have to make sure you have all the right pieces in place. Nothing’s going to happen overnight.”

Nonetheless, he’s excited about the momentum Publicis has exhibited in recent months. And he marvels at the pace of the long-discussed convergence of data, technology and platforms, plus the growth of industry partnerships.

“We’ve been waiting for it for a long time. The next three to five years are going to be super interesting,” Shlachter says.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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Faster, More Nimble Is The Mantra At Creative Shop Erich & Kallman https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/steve-erich.html Tue, 18 Apr 2017 21:26:57 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45479 [...]]]> LOS ANGELES – Being big for the sake of buying clout used to differentiate media agencies. Now creative agencies are finding ways of trimming down to keep pace with ever-speedier, lower-paying client demands.

For Steve Erich, “not your typical agency model” means contracting for the best creative talent for the nascent Erich & Kallman shop based in San Francisco. “Agencies on the whole are too slow, they don’t have enough talent and they’re too expensive,” the E&K Founder & Managing Director explains in this interview with Beet.TV at the 2017 Transformation conference of the 4A’s.

Having spent about 11 years at Crispin Porter + Bogusky, last year Erich finally was able to join up with Eric Kallman and give the biggest agencies a run for their money.

“My partner Eric Kallman is a gentleman that we tried to hire about three years ago” at CP+B. “He took a job at Goodby instead” and produced iconic work for companies like Old Spice. “We got together after we both left our agencies to create a new model.”

Erich likens their creation to a small, core group of individuals that contract creative work out to the best in the business “just for the amount of time we need. It makes us faster, it makes us more efficient.”

E&K’s account wins include a piece of business from General Mills, which was “looking for a new model. Faster, more nimble,” Erich says.

As regards creative briefs from clients, there’s noting out of the ordinary at E&K, although it is a big believer in the power of video. While television is still “the main thing that’s asked for” among advertisers, there’s a learning curve when it comes to digital.

“Just thinking you can cram a 30-second television spot into a Facebook post or whatever else is just not that effective. It’s better than not, but there are so many other ways to create video and content format-wise,” says Erich.

This video is part of series produced in Los Angeles at the 4A’s Transformation ’17. The series is sponsored by Extreme Reach. For more videos from the conference, please visit this page.

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Like Sponsorships, Content Marketing Requires Connecting With Audiences: Momentum Worldwide’s Weil https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/chris-weil.html Tue, 18 Apr 2017 17:05:50 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45434 [...]]]> LOS ANGELES – If you could hold a mirror to the current world of content marketing it would largely reflect what’s been happening for a long time in sports and entertainment sponsorships. One of the elemental rules is that just borrowing enthusiast audiences doesn’t cut it unless you actually connect with them.

“It’s not about writing a check and being part of something,” says Chris Weil, Chairman and CEO of brand marketing agency Momentum Worldwide. “You’re borrowing the equity of a team, a celebrity, a league and you’re borrowing their audience and you’re trying to connect with them.”

In the sports sponsorship world, whether it’s American Express, United Airlines, Coca-Cola, SAP or Verizon, “A sponsorship is a borrowed equity programming,” Weil says in this interview with Beet.TV at the 2017 Transformation conference of the 4A’s.

So if one looks at what brands are trying to do with content, the learnings from many years of sponsorship marketing come to the fore. It’s about how to create content “that is not just push messaging but is about how you add utility and value to the consumer’s life and to their experience,” Weil says.

In other words, successfully sponsoring content always begins with the audience and the value exchange, but the most important part is the desired connection. “Everybody talks about targeting, targeting, targeting and how we’re going to deliver the specific message at the specific moment,” says Weill. “The reality is that more than targeting it’s the creative. How are you actually going to deliver a message that somebody cares about at a given time.”

Asked about measuring ROI on sponsored content, Weil eschews things like viewability and click-through rates. “Those are just distractions to what the real game is, which is to drive growth for our clients,” Weil adds, citing Procter & Gamble Chief Brand Officer Marc Pritchard’s comments at Transformation about the importance of P&G’s agency partners.

When it comes to leveraging influencer audiences online, Weil says that in order to guarantee earned reach there has to be a buy involved. “Things don’t go viral just simply to go viral. You have to look at how you use influencer audiences to help expand and amplify your message. And that is a value exchange that typically is money,” Weil says.

This video is part of series produced in Los Angeles at the 4A’s Transformation ’17. The series is sponsored by Extreme Reach. For more videos from the conference, please visit this page.

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Innovid’s Chalozin On Internet TV’s UX Imperative https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/17brinnovidchalozin.html Tue, 18 Apr 2017 11:00:38 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45308 [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR — Around the world, television sets are getting connected to the internet – and that is creating a huge new opportunity for a new breed of gatekeeper.

But the new broadcast contenders should not just assume they will become all powerful.

One executive brokering the future of connected TV advertising thinks quality of experience must be the watchword.

“Television is at the mid-stage of migrating in to the digital world,”Innovid co-founder Tal Chalozin tells Beet.TV in this video interview. “Beyond Sling, Sony Vue and DirectTV Now, YouTube is coming along, Hulu is delivering their live television service, maybe Apple will deliver their service.

“More and more people will stop paying or not even start their cable bill and immediately pay Google or Hulu and that will be their television service.

“Companies have a responsibility to create television quality equal to television now. Which means television should never buffer, should be high quality, volume should be correlated. All those things which seem very simple are actually hard to do.”

Chalozin’s Innovid, which helps advertisers personalise their video messages for viewers, claims to be processing a third of all video ads in the US.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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Adobe, Simulmedia Execs Examine How Digital Data Can Inform Linear TV https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/linearvalue-panel.html Mon, 17 Apr 2017 23:54:37 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45449 [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR – There’s no shortage of data to apply to linear television audience targeting and, likewise, a variety of ways to attribute campaign results. In the middle lies the customer experience, which is also data-fueled and growing more sophisticated by the day.

These and other insights emerged from a discussion about enhancing the value of traditional TV at the 2017 Beet.TV Executive Retreat. Moderated by MediaLink Managing Partner Matt Spiegel, it featured Arthur Mimnaugh, Head of Advanced Advertising for Adobe, and Marc Siegel, the CRO at advanced TV provider Simulmedia.

Siegel described the process of using advanced data sets to both predict where people are going to be watching TV and reaching them in a cost-efficient manger. Finding untapped audience potential can be counter-intuitive, as in “We’re seeing that if you’re a sports enthusiast, there’s plenty of those watching the cookie channel,” Siegel said.

The goal for Simulmedia is to generate unique audience reach by gauging how many new people a particular ad inventory unit will bring to an advertiser. This is typically a complement to an advertiser’s Upfront or base buy.

“There’s certainly a wide debate on what the right attribution model is,” Siegel said. “There is not a one-size-fits all when it comes to measurement.” It can range from a direct-to-consumer brand with lots of data to work with to those in consumer-packaged goods where data sets can have “a little less fidelity.”

Mimnaugh explained how Adobe helps marketers extend the information they already know about the users they already have in order to improve their viewing experiences. “One big area of focus is the collective group and the value of it,” he said in a reference to Adobe’s Device Co-Op, a network to brands to work together to better identify consumers across digital touch points. “So you can look at ad sequencing and targeting and other types of storytelling, when you’re merging that between what you’re going to do on traditional linear versus what’s actually happening on digital.”

Asked by Spiegel how advanced is the conversation about consistent consumer ID’s, Mimnaugh said, “I think we are seeing more and more of the notion of a common ID. It’s a process.”

For his part, Siegel noted that Simulmedia isn’t in the personally identifiable information business. “What we’re seeing is CRM’s collapsing with DMP’s identifiers and being able to transfer that over to linear has been a huge move,” he said.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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Programmers Are Making TV Ads Audience-Based: explains Disney/ABC, NBC, Turner, Viacom & 605 at Beet Retreat https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/17brpanelprogram.html Mon, 17 Apr 2017 23:51:56 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45394 [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR — Already this year, several of the big US TV networks have declared they will make moves to let advertising buyers use granular and first-party viewer data, over and above traditional Nielsen data, to target ads on linear TV.

Speaking on this Beet Retreat panel, representatives of the networks explained their strategy.

The recent announcements included:

  • Fox, Viacom and Turner teamed to form OpenAP, a system in which they will allow ad buyers to define audience segments that are targetable across the networks, not just individually.
  • NBC plans to sell $1bn of its upfront inventory through its own Audience Targeting Platform.
  • A+E followed with a similar announcement.

NBCUniversal advanced advertising SVP Denise Colella:

“We’re going to avail up to $1bn in inventory to be traded on non-Nielsen guarantees, or audience guarantees.

“Our clients are investing a lot in data, they really want to put that to use. We’re willing to put our money where our mouth is. We’re not reserving inventory per se. We’re making all our inventory across all of our networks available for audience.”

Turner Broadcasting ad innovation and programatic VP David Porter:

“OpenAP does three things – helps define audience segment, allows an advertiser to choose wha publishers they want to share that segment with, and aggregates reports. That solves a lot.

“There will be no commingling of inventory in this platform, this is not a transaction platform. This is just a way to get a consistent definition. Then the advertiser can send that definition out to any publisher.”

Viacom audience science EVP Julian Zilberbrand:

“It is uber-complicated to have different methodologies when you have one data set you’re working off of.

“This is about enabling the advertiser to have an easier experience.”

ABC TV Group programmatic VP Michael Dean:

“We’re excited about it and we’re supportive. This is all the right things to do. Removing friction, removing cost, lowering complexity is absolutely where all of us want that market to go – as long as we can make differentiation, that’s the key.

“The devil is in the details.  For Disney Company, it’s about ‘How do we bring our unique data assets – what we know about families, homes, from the parks, from our games network?’”

605 president Ben Tatta:

“It’s great news. We felt, for a while, that there will be a shift to more audience-based buying, selling and measurement – but that starts by moving off a panel, which is really just a large focus group. It drives demand for census-based data. The market is demanding that more granular attributes, other than age and gender, are available.”

Panelists also discussed the emergence of addressable TV advertising technologies and amateur versus premium video.

This interview was conducted by MediaLink MD Matt Spiegel.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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Assembly’s Lee: Short On Silos, Big On Data And Transparency https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/francois-lee.html Mon, 17 Apr 2017 23:49:45 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45457 [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR – Having worked nearly two decades for a major holding company media agency, Francois Lee prefers the “pipeline” of data that runs through MDC Partners’ Assembly to “siloed verticals.”

When MDC launched Assembly three years ago, it combined the prowess of TargetCast, RJ Palmer and Doner Media under one roof. Lee joined in 2015 from MediaVest, where he had spent 16 years and seen enough silos.

“We had a lot of leeway to build what we need in the marketplace versus inheriting what’s already there,” Lee, who is EVP of Investment at Assembly, says in this interview at the 2017 Beet.TV Executive Retreat. “Having everything under one roof helps us build a pipeline that goes through the entire company in sharing, accessing and analyzing the data.”

Lee’s background is in traditional TV video landscape, where there was far less data to inform decision making. “We have more information than before in seeing what networks, what dayparts, what spots are working harder for us,” he says. “I’m excited about having more data available to me in the way I activate.”

Having all teams under one roof is another plus. “I sit very close with the analytics team to see what’s working, what’s not working. Having everything under one roof helps us build a pipeline that goes through the entire company in sharing, accessing and analyzing the data.”

In addition to having data and analytics at the company’s core, Assembly takes a different tack when it comes to media buying practices that have raised eyebrows in the client community.

“We also strongly believe in building everything around a very transparent model,” Lee says.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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West Elm’s Chatelain On Digital Channels: Start Small, Gauge Results And Ramp Up Successes https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/west-elms-chatelain-on-digital-channels-start-small-gauge-results-and-ramp-up-successes.html Sun, 16 Apr 2017 16:17:43 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45163 [...]]]> Television can drive big awareness, but with digital media brands can take small steps with small budgets and “test and learn” their way to success. This, in essence, is the approach online and brick-and-mortar retailer West Elm has taken during nearly 30 consecutive months of profitability.

West Elm has shied away from spending money on TV commercials because “there’s no real specific ROI that you can pull out from it without doing a lot of very sort of fuzzy math,” says Luke Chatelain, Vice President of Innovation at West Elm. Chatelain was among the many industry executives who attended the recent Beet.TV Leadership Summit titled Outcomes, presented by video marketing technology provider Eyeview.

During one panel discussion, he explained the beauty of small budgets, small steps and ramping up successes. “Digital allows us to do a really small spend to set a benchmark and understand what the benefits and the potential are for an application, or piece of content, a technology, a delivery mechanism, and scale that up as we start to see success,” said Chatelain.

“We tend to have this desire and ability to validate those things before we actually go out there and spend large dollars on them,” he added.

Asked about the challenges of personalizing video to engage with specific audience segments by moderator Rebecca Lieb, who is an Advisory Board Member at Netswitch Technology Management Inc., Chatelain again stressed small steps. “If you look at it from an entire business perspective, it’s a rather massive potential,” he said. “Understanding small steps toward bringing your business forward is really important in how you can handle personalization.”

Chatelain is no stranger to industry jargon. “If I had a nickel for every time someone said machine learning, without actually understanding what machine learning was, I would have a yacht at this point,” he told the audience.

This video is part of a Beet.TV leadership summit on video outcomes presented by Eyeview. For more videos from event, please visit this page.

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Is Viewability A Sideshow? Moat, Ooyala & Eyeview Discuss https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/17brpanelviewability.html Sun, 16 Apr 2017 16:12:50 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45416 [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR — Digital advertisers need a common metric for what constitutes user-viewable video inventory – but they shouldn’t rely on it as the prime driver of their strategy.

That is according to a trio of ad-tech execs whose companies help bring some visibility to the problem, but who say the challenge is greater than that.

Almost three years after the Media Ratings Council set guidelines for what constitutes a viewable ad impression (50% of the video player in view for at least two seconds), Beet.TV convened a panel to discuss viewability at the Beet Retreat.

The discussion, viewable in our recorded session, showed a general appreciation for viewability – and a recognition that it should be used as just part of an overarching strategy.

Moat sales director Peter Kuhn:

“Viewability should be a baseline standard but it shouldn’t drive investment.

“We fundamentally need standards. If we’re all going to grade, as Mark Pritchard of P&G said, a yard the same way, it’s impossible to start asking questions around where investment should go, what effectiveness is, if we’re not all measuring things the same way.

“(But) the consumptive patterns of consumers is outpacing the ability for a marketers to … come up with the right standards for success.”

Ooyala advertising platforms GM Scott Braley:

“The idea of needing standards is categorically right. (But) the intimacy between buyers and sellers has, for a while now, been lost and needs to be regained.

“When you rely on those (companies) that are all too willing, ready and happy to be intermediaries – to rely on the platforms without understanding who you’re buying, what the inventory is or what you’re selling to – that’s when you start to over-rely on the idea of metrics as a universal truth for good and bad. That’s a subjective thing.

“They’re so myopically focused on the idea of this metric, and not what you’re buying.”

Eyeview Digital TV SVP and GM Boaz Cohen

“We need standards – but for us, our standard is sales. Instead of focusing on media metrics – viewability, completions and other stuff – we focus on sales. Give us $100k for video budgets, we’ll deliver you $300k in sales.

“We do need viewability … but that’s our problem, the supply problem, the ad-tech problem – not the marketer problem. Their standard should be sales; focused on offline and online sales.”

Cohen countered the suggestion that video outcomes are only for driving immediate actions, saying that marketer outcomes linked to video – including car dealership visitation and loyalty card-linked retail purchases – can be measured up to 30 days after an ad is watched.

The panel was moderated by MediaMath CMO Joanna O’Connell.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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New Data Sources Are Coming: TruOptik, Neustar, Alphonso & 605 Discuss https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/17brpaneldata.html Sun, 16 Apr 2017 16:03:57 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45413 [...]]]> VIEQUES, PR — Age, gender and demographic just don’t cut it anymore. In the new age of advertising super-powers, marketers want to target consumers with more more granularity and certainty than traditional measurements allow.

Fortunate, then, that a whole new raft of data sources is coming on-stream to help them do that.

In a panel discussion convened by Beet.TV at the Beet Retreat, executives from advertising technology and data vendors got excited about:

  • Audio Content Recognition (ACR)
  • Set-top box data
  • Second-by-second TV viewing data
  • App-level measurement
  • Open-network data

Here is a flavour of what they said…

Alphonso CEO Ashish Chordia:

“In 10 years’ time, there’s no reason to believe that every device in your house runs ACR – we’ll get there.”

Chordia says his technology, running on consumers’ mobile phones amongst other devices, has already helped a mobile studio know for sure whether a consumer is in a movie theater watching its movie.

TruOptik CEO Andre Swanston:

“We marry the app data we get from OTT and connected TV with the open network. You get content viewership data, second-by-second, across half a billion unique IPs in every market in the world. For people coming from desktop and mobile, this is what they’re used to.”

Neustar strategic partners head Ted Prince:

“(We have) a persistent key across household, phone number, address, cookie, mobile ad ID, set-top box, IP address, mobile phone number.

“We try to make sure you, as a marketer, can get to the household you want. You can put your CRM file on there, the segments you want to reach. We have 200m individuals. Set-top box data is about 40 to 45m households.”

605  Group VP Gaurav Shirole:

“We’ve been focused on achieving scale around census-level set-top box data.”

Shirole said there is an opportunity to use data-targeted TV ad technologies first to sample limited precision-targeting, before going all-in with a targeted campaign.

Amid this proliferation of new data sources, it is becoming a more complex media world for marketers. Whilst some vendors may profess to do it all, TruOptik’s Swanston said it is important for brands to piece together multiple specialist vendors.

“There’s nobody in the industry can be a one-stop shop for everything, and there have to be the ability to sync different data together,” he said. “That’s pretty commonplace across the industry – you have to be able to work with different partners.”

The panel was moderated by MediaMath CMO Joanna O’Connell.

This video is part of a series produced at the Beet.TV Executive Retreat in Vieques. The event and series is presented by Videology and 605. For more videos from the series, please visit this page.

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Alphonso’s Gall Targets Distracted TV Viewers On Second Screens https://www.beet.tv/2017/04/174aalphonsogall.html Sun, 16 Apr 2017 16:01:38 +0000 https://www.beet.tv/?p=45419 [...]]]> LOS ANGELES — For TV advertisers eager to see the effect of their campaign more quickly, a US- and India-based company claims to have the answer.

Alphonso, which offers the ability for buyers to serve ads on to digital devices based on an understanding of consumers’ TV viewing behaviour, also this month launched closed-loop attribution.

The product is the paid version of the company’s otherwise-free Alphonso Insights, using data tracking from partners like SafeGraph, IRI and MasterCard.

“‘Did my TV campaign work?’,” Alphonso chief revenue officer Mark Gall asks in this video interview with Beet.TV. “TV to closed-loop attribution organisations doing analysis (take) six months …getting a report.

“We’re able to shrink the amount of time from weeks and months and quarters… to a couple of days

“You can take a TV creative, measure back and see the results. What was the foot traffic to the store, to the dealership? That’s never been done before. You used to have to wait a month and a half.”

Alphonso suite includes real-time data on what’s being aired across more than 200 US TV networks. It then uses automated content recognition (ACR) technology embedded on consumer devices like smartphones to listen out for what’s airing on nearby TVs.

The ensuing data, indicating what consumers are watching, can be used to target ads on digital devices. But a better way of looking at it may be to target based on what consumers are not watching, Gall says.

We have known for years how brands recognise consumers are “second-screening”, using a phone or tablet to distract themselves from TV commercial breaks.

“If people are looking down (at their phone) when my commercial comes on – that million-dollar, beautiful commercial – I’ve got to think, is that beautiful TV ad now a really expensive radio ad?,” he says.  “We can take that, and serve that same ad … in your lap, to a phone, tablet or desktop.”

This video is part of series produced in Los Angeles at the 4A’s Transformation ’17. The series is sponsored by Extreme Reach. For more videos from the conference, please visit this page.

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