Beet.TV http://www.beet.tv The root to the media revolution Tue, 06 Dec 2016 03:21:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6.1 INVIDI’s ‘Addressability In The Sky’ Excites 605’s Dolan http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/16ftvdolan.html Tue, 06 Dec 2016 03:21:06 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43719 [...]]]> LONDON — In the emerging world of “addressable TV advertising” – in which operators can swap out a standard 30-second spot for one custom-targeted at a single viewer – cable and online platforms may appears to have the upper hand.

But satellite is far from out of the game. UK satellite pay-TV operator Sky had its AdSmart product in the marketplace for a couple of years now, pushing multiple ads to subscribers’ set-top boxes for subsequent decisioning.

And INVIDI, the early addressable TV pioneer helping operators realize the technology, is launching a new offering leveraging low-earth orbit satellites to help broadcasters transmit multiple streams of alternate ads to viewers’ screens, switched at the client side.

Just acquired by AT&T, DISH and WPP, Invidi launched what it called “satellite switching“, and Kristin Dolan thinks it could be big. The founder of new addressable TV data firm 605 Group spoke with Beet.TV for this video interview.

“It’s about addressability – the opportunity to do full addressability country-by-country, with satellite transponders – doing addressability in the sky,” she says.

“This is about facilitating that to homes from the sky, which we think is amazing, we’re very excited about it, especially here in London.”

Having sold Cablevision to French telecom firm Altice earlier in 2016, Dolan and her husband James, who had been CEO of Cablevision, recently announced that their Dolan Family Ventures acquired Analytics Media Group, a pioneer in the use of set-top box data.

This interview was conducted at the Future of TV Advertising Forum in London. Beet.TV’s coverage is presented by the 605.  For other videos from the series, please visit this page

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Targeting & Creative ‘Go Hand In Hand,’ Says 4C Insights’ Gupta http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/data-panel2.html Tue, 06 Dec 2016 02:46:54 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43744 [...]]]> MIAMI – While at Mixpo, Anupam Gupta played in the creative management layer space. However, the last five to seven years in advertising “have been all about targeting,” says the Chief Product Officer for 4C Insights. “But that doesn’t mean that we won’t come back to creative.”

During a panel discussion at the recent Beet.tv Retreat 2016, Gupta explains the 4C product suite, which includes activation on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Snapchat and Twitter as well as TV-synced ads across digital display, mobile, search, social and video.

“We have figured out, by looking at each and every platform that we’re integrated with, the right metrics and have the whole closed-loop optimization kind of built in,” he says in response to a question from moderator Matt Prohaska of Prohaska Consulting.

4C Insights doesn’t want to be known as just another data provider, according to Gupta. “For us, it’s about connecting data and activation. Those two things happen side by side,” Gupta says.

The company also provides advertising and content analytics leveraging its Teletrax global TV monitoring network and proprietary social affinity database.

Mixpo developed a modern enterprise cloud platform to help media companies, advertisers and agencies run advertising campaigns, with an emphasis on the proper creative elements. “I absolutely believe that as ad tech and marketing tech com together, and you think about what the challenges and opportunities are for marketers, targeting and creative go hand in hand,” Gupta says.

Asked whether there are specific winning formulas for specific social media platforms, Gupta says, “There are so many different things. Direct response campaigns. Direct mapping to conversion versus branding campaigns. There’s no one answer to that.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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Addressable TV Is A ‘Tactic That’s Evolving’: Comcast’s Kevin Smith http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/kevin-smith.html Tue, 06 Dec 2016 02:43:52 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43649 [...]]]> MIAMI – Whether the subject is Nielsen ratings, video on demand or addressable television advertising, communications giant Comcast is all about the “macro experience” for consumers and advertisers. This holistic approach to the rapidly evolving entertainment landscape comes across loud and clear from Kevin Patrick Smith in a panel discussion at the recent Beet.TV Retreat 2016.

Prompted by panel moderator Ashley J. Swartz, CEO and Founder of Furious Corp., to reflect on the transformation of Comcast over the last several years, Smith, who is SVP of Comcast Media 360, invokes the fictional Philadelphia-based company Kabletown.

“When you look at the legacy cable company created by Ralph Roberts, which was parodied on a show called 30 Rock, which is on a network we owned, and you look at where it is today, the way we look at it is in the eyes of the customer and certainly the advertiser,” Smith says.

He goes on to cite the “radical evolution of measurement” from C3 and its innumerable permutations along with the many choices consumers have for viewing video content. “I think it’s constantly evolving, but the one thing that we really do focus on and we have to be cause it’s competitive is the consumer experience,” says Smith.

When he mentions addressable TV advertising, Smith puts it into a larger perspective. “I’m so glad you’re taking this beyond just addressable,” Smith says. “I think addressable is a tactic. It’s part of a plan. It’s evolving. We’re all learning.”

While specialist companies like GroupM’s Modi Media are “very advanced” in the addressable TV space, “others are getting up to par,” according to Smith.

He then acknowledges the benefits of addressable TV for providing more accountability for advertising spending, in the process offering a caveat that’s close to home at Comcast.

“And for us, we want to do that,” Smith says of addressable. “But we’re a big advertiser. We spend a significant amount of money. So we want to use it too. But it’s all in the context of our overall media plan and the tactics that we deploy.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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Furious Corp.’s Swartz: Disparate CMS Systems Hinder Media Companies http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/data-planning1.html Tue, 06 Dec 2016 02:37:09 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43740 [...]]]> MIAMI – Media companies have lots of untapped data wealth but cannot realize it because their CMS systems don’t like to share, is one of Ashley J. Swartz’s theses and a contributing factor to her formation of Furious Corp. “We just decided to tackle the unsexy, hard problem of connecting all these disparate systems and datasets, and to really provide the tools to make much more informed decision using data,” Swartz explains during a panel discussion at the recent Beet.tv Retreat 2016.

Furious Corp.’s Prophet is an enterprise management platform for television broadcasters and premium publishers to manage pricing and planning of cross-platform video inventory. Among other things, it’s a tool for forecasting, “which everybody neglects but is an essential precursor to a better planning, pricing, allocation and optimization business process,” Swartz says.

“The other big part of our thesis is there is so much wealth to be unlocked at media companies,” Swartz continues. “If media companies aren’t empowered with insights and information and they don’t understand their own audiences, how are they going to package and deliver that audience to an advertiser?”

At many large media companies, there is one CMS per television network and a separate one for digital, making it difficult to build cross-platform plans, Swartz says in response to a question from Matt Prohaska of Prohaska Consulting.

“What better place are you going to mine insights than looking at your digital audience behavior and viewing behavior and adjacent behavior to build a better television schedule?” says Swartz.

While this should be a quick win, according to Swartz, “because the CMS’s are disparate and don’t talk to one another, that media company is disadvantaged going to the negotiation table.”

As a result, “value is going to be had by a middle person putting their hand in the pot. We believe there’s an opportunity to recapture more of the value upstream by empowering them.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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Admore’s Condon Aims To Automated TV Ad Delivery http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/br16admorecondon.html Tue, 06 Dec 2016 02:34:38 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43490 [...]]]> MIAMI — Celebrating its third birthday this quarter is Admore, it’s a division of Frank Canella’s Canella Media, a company aiming to bring direct-response mechanisms to television.

Led by president Brendan Condon, a former AOL international ad exec, the Temecula, CA-based outfit’s platform numbers an automated system for using a single insertion order to buy across TV, one of several taking a tilt at making the industry more efficient.

“I can submit an RP or an IO electronically into your systems; we can take the assets and distribute them out to 1,200 unique partners,” Condon tells Beet.TV in this video interview.

“In the TV space, unlike digital, we don’t have a DoubleClick that can dynamically ad-serve. We have to literally take those physical properties and send them out to the stations.

“The majority of the stations today, thank god, have some technology where you can put it up on a cloud and they bring down the creative. But we still have clients on the media side that say, “No, you know what, send me a tape” … on FedEx. It drives me crazy. But they have great viewing audiences, so it’s worth it for us to do that.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Furious Corp CEO Ashley J. Swartz.

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Start ‘Em Young: Affinity Is Born Early: Videology CEO Ferber http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/16brvideologyferber.html Mon, 05 Dec 2016 00:54:02 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43691 [...]]]> MIAMI — You may find yourself deciding between two cars, or cans of beans or a hotel chains this week. But when did your judgements about the brands involved really begin?

Earlier than you might think, according to one ad-tech exec helping brands capitalise on targeted video and TV ads.

In fact, in a world increasingly dominated by super-planned, hyper-targeted digital video ads, Scott Ferber believes conventional TV has a role in helping build early brand affinity in teenagers.

“When I’m 12 years old, there needs to be an aspiration created in my mind for the luxury vehicle that I intend to purchase when I’m capable of affording it,” the Videology CEO says in this panel interview with Beet.TV.

“To target a teenager with this type of sight-sound-motion creative can develop an aspiration for me to want to be a Lexus owner, for example, or Infiniti, or whatever luxury vehicle we’re talking about.

“(It’s) huge opportunity. We don’t want to let that go because, by the time I’m 40 and I actually have the money to buy … if you’re trying to convince me Infiniti over Lexus, it’s actually too late. I’ve already developed my aspirational desires much earlier.”

Ferber’s company recently revved up a new partnership with car info and listings publisher Autobytel, leveraging its audience data to target TV and video ads.

In the auto industry, a lot of consumer research is now carried out online, but purchase mostly still takes place on the forecourt, and customers’ early interest can still be swayed by luscious TV ads.

Ferber says it’s the same with soft drinks – your preference for Coke or Pepsi is moulded between the ages of 12 and 15.

“To create the awareness for something like the Lexus and the desire to say ‘This is the brand to which I aspire to buy when I can afford it one day’, age and gender is actually a great way to do it,” he adds.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Matt Spiegel, MD of MediaLink.

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Automation And Standards Will Propel Growth Of Addressable TV, Says Modi’s Power http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/jamie-power-3.html Mon, 05 Dec 2016 00:40:58 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43555 [...]]]> MIAMI – An apt analogy for planning and executing addressable television advertising could be tackling a giant jigsaw puzzle. Unless you’re a robot, there’s no way to automate the process of piecing it all together.

Jamie Power began to learn this about three years ago when she joined the launch of GroupM’s Modi Media advanced TV unit, now employing some 30 people. Nonetheless, it’s a challenge she’s heartily embraced.

“To be honest, it’s been the best three years of my career, it’s been so much fun,” Power says in an interview with Beet.TV. “TV is in such a transformational state, so that’s why I feel just lucky to be a part of that.”

She started with tune-in advertisers because set-top box data from MVPD’s was readily available, and then scaled the process out to categories like automotive and financial. “Even if the data set isn’t currently hooked directly with an MVPD, we can work directly with Acxiom or Experian and they can do rev share,” Power says. “So basically the answer is never no. The answer might be, ‘give me three days to let me figure out how to connect all the pieces.’”

While it’s easier to justify the cost of addressable for more expensive products or services—say, a $7 allergy medicine versus a $40,000 car—there are no limits given a proper analysis of the effective cost per thousand impressions, according to Power.

She views Modi as unique in that the background of most of its people is either in TV, strategy or research, whereas other holding companies have their digital leads heading up addressable advertising. “Our understanding is it’s TV first,” she says. “We understand it’s TV and respect that it’s TV. Now data and tech are just bringing new opportunities.”

Asked by interviewer Tim Hanlon, Founder and CEO of The Vertere Group, what would make her daily work easier, Power points to automation and standardization. “There’s definitely a need for pieces of the process to be automated. There’s definitely a need for standards. You can’t scale anything without standards,” Power says.

Nonetheless, “The future holds amazing things for addressability. We just have to connect the pieces and stay positive,” Power adds.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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Programmers, MVPD’s Should Unite On Addressable TV: Mediavest | Spark’s Bokor http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/jonathan-bokor-3.html Mon, 05 Dec 2016 00:26:03 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43550 [...]]]> MIAMI – Even though addressable television advertising is outpacing audience-indexed programmatic and over-the-top TV, OTT “is going to be the end game,” according to Jonathan Bokor.

In the meantime, unless programmers and MVPD’s come together to make more inventory available for addressable ads, digital “will start to eat television’s lunch,” the Director of Advanced Media at Mediavest | Spark opines in an interview with Beet.TV.

Once all TV migrates to Internet Protocol delivery, advertisers will be able to determine what’s reach and what’s frequency—a distinction now blurred by the rise of different delivery mechanisms over the past few decades. “Eventually, all TV will be delivered by IP and I think that will open up a lot of possibilities and make things simpler,” Bokor says in response to a question from interviewer Tim Hanlon, Founder and CEO of The Vertere Group.

Those possibilities include the ability to re-aggregate reach caused by viewing fractionalization. “Once you move towards all IP and now we have a limited number of identifiers that we can match in a DMP, you can know exactly what is reach and what is frequency,” Bokor explains.

Marketers will still have mass reach against broad targets, along with being able to do more granular audience targeting on an impression-by-impression basis to reduce or eliminate waste, according to Bokor. “Those two tools will be used in combination for a more sophisticated way of blending those two techniques to get at whatever goal a marketer has,” he says.

Asked by Hanlon why there isn’t more addressable TV inventory available, Bokor points to the age-old relationship between networks and MVPD’s. It’s a union that has centered on subscriber fees and distribution.

“And that has been a contentious relationship” that has typically favored the programmers, says Bokor. “That’s why those fees go up regularly and the cost of a pay TV subscription goes up regularly,” he adds. “But I think you’re starting to see that that’s fraying.”

He thinks the situation has reached the upper limit of what marginal subscribers are willing to pay for cable TV packages. “I think we’re starting to see that the two sides need to come together a little bit and hopefully they will come together and find a way to share the cost and benefits of implementing addressable,” Bokor says.

While 1% of TV spending now devoted to addressable is “pretty impressive,” the industry cannot get to 25% using just local inventory controlled by MVPD’s. This problem does not exist on the digital side, which is why digital as a whole is bigger than TV and soon, mobile alone will be bigger than TV, according to Bokor.

Digital “will start to eat television’s lunch if television doesn’t start to make these capabilities available,” he says.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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MasterCard’s Jankowski Sees ‘Priceless’ Opportunities In Content http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/br16mastercardben.html Sun, 04 Dec 2016 13:46:04 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43715 [...]]]> MIAMI — It’s a wide-open new marketing world, with a big new creative palette. But sometimes picking the right brush can be half the battle.

MasterCard is one big brand with all the tools at its disposal. So how is it thinking about the right advertising tactics to deploy?

In this video interview, MasterCard’s media SVP Ben Jankowski tells Beet.TV the company sees opportunity in tapping media companies to create its messaging, whilst dynamic creative personalization is filled with burden.

“Media owners are in the business of creating content,” he says. “So, rather than just have us create our own message and then run it on our distribution network (we) utilize them to help us create content.

“So go work with sports networks to create really cool sports experiences, and they can produce messaging around it. You know, food companies, travel partners like TripAdvisor and guys like that. We’re getting into the rhythm of using them to help us create content.”

Branded content is an opportunity many major companies are now embracing. Another opportunity is to customize TV and video commercials for individual recipients.

So-called “dynamic creative personalization” is the art of assembling a video ad from multiple scene permutations, depending on the targeting criteria.

That’s a challenge for MasterCard, which has operated the “Priceless” campaign for years. And Jakowski sees a challenge in the chance.

“Back when dinosaurs roamed the earth … you created one piece of advertising and you ran a campaign around it,” he says.

“Now, if we’re really bringing the promise to full life, you have to create … multiple experiences.

“If we can’t figure out how to build the kind of scale that we need to do bring that to life, it just slows us down a little bit.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Matt Spiegel, MD of MediaLink.

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Acxiom’s Schmitt On Porting Online Campaigns To TV http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/16brscxiomschmitt.html Sun, 04 Dec 2016 13:41:51 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43499 [...]]]> MIAMI — So you have been running an online ad campaign, and how you’re keen to harness the possibilities afforded by new TV ad tactics. Can you use the same data to target the same kind of audience, in the old medium?

Sure, you can – but doing so takes a bit of work, according to the marketing technology company Acxiom.

“If you have the onboarding and the cookie pool to move it over deterministically and you’ve got the best identity graph in the business, it works really well,” says Eric Schmitt, Acxiom’s advanced TV advertising VP.

“An advertiser will come in with customers who visited their website and they want to bring that to television. In that case we have to do some extra work—some modelling, some analytics. ”

Acxiom expanded its addressable TV ad offering back this January, allowing advertisers to bring first- and third-party datasets to the targeting table.

“We’re able to start with either the PII base, the personal information, the name and address that we would start with in TV and match that off against our national reference file,” Schmitt adds. “And then onboard that onto cookies through our LiveRamp division, or we can start the other way with cookies, which is an emerging use case we see. ”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Matter More Media CEO Tracey Scheppach.

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Trump’s Campaign Success Has Lessons For Marketers, comScore’s Livek http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/16comscorelivek.html Fri, 02 Dec 2016 12:06:30 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43693 [...]]]> MIAMI — He famously under-spent his rival on TV ads, making greater hay from late-night tweets and sometimes outlandish monologues.

So does Donald Trump’s eventual election suggest a crisis in TV ad effectiveness?

When the most important political period in US democracy turns back the clock on what had been accelerating ad spend, is it time for another playbook?

One ad measurement exec says TV is still relevant – it’s just becoming a part of a new, multi-layered execution environment..

“Well I think there’s going to be another book written,”says Bill Livek, the former Rentrak CEO who joined comScore’s executive vice chairman in the recent merger of the TV and digital measurers.  He now serves as president.

“One of the two candidates, the one that prevailed here in the election, used a lot of these disciplines. That candidate spent a lot less, but he was very selective in what he did.

“I think there’s a lot of lessons to be learned that the combination of what we have digitally, socially, and with television now is working together in this ecosystem.

“I don’t think we clearly comprehend as marketers how fluidly it works with the consumer. We’re clearly still a believer in traditional television because of its mass reach, but we’re also big believers that the future is around the advanced targeting on all the different platforms.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Matt Prohaska, CEO of Prohaska Consulting.

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Data-Driven Campaigns Demand Automation, Horstman Says http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/br16audiencehorstman.html Fri, 02 Dec 2016 12:02:11 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43488 [...]]]> MIAMI –The possibilities are endless, the data-points are infinite and opportunities to reach consumers abound.

You want to allocate human staff to run all that? Good luck, says AudienceXpress‘s Walt Horstman – this level of complexity, in the new TV ad ecosystem, needs a fallback to code.

“You apply an advanced dataset that is looking at … the audience impressions against each one of those individual nets and day parts,” he says.

“We’ve got a grid now of 1,200 different opportunities. That is impossible to execute against without having true type automation.

“So, if we are moving into this world of data-driven campaigns, we must have that automation … to make it easier.”

By now, many advertisers and buying agencies are used to using systems that automate the targeting and delivery of online ads.

TV, by virtue of being an upfront-old ad channel, remains an edge case, however. And Horsman sees the pain points.

AudienceXpress’ web-based platform aims to let ad buyers manage campaigns, get reports, optimize details and automate delivery.

“Agencies are struggling to work across all the channels that they are now dealing with, and so they can’t afford to continue to do a lot of these manual processes,” he says. “There has to be ease of use.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Furious Corp CEO Ashley J. Swartz.

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AT&T’s Welch On INVIDI Deal: ‘Huge Opportunity’ For Cross-Screen Addressable Ads http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/mike-welch.html Fri, 02 Dec 2016 03:45:21 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43679 [...]]]> LONDON – If where you spend your time and money says a lot about your priorities, AT&T has anted up in a big way on cross-screen addressable advertising with its participation in the acquisition of INVIDI Technologies.

“We’ve been spending a lot of our time and a lot of our money on addressable television,” Mike Welch, Head of Strategy, Product & Business Development for AT&T AdWorks, says during an interview with Beet.TV this week at the Future of TV Advertising Forum.

AT&T, DISH Network and WPP recently announced their joint acquisition of INVIDI, a leader in providing addressable advertising platforms. In addition to extensive distribution in U.S. households, INVIDI is actively deploying its technology and negotiating distribution agreements in Europe, South America and Asia.

“The INVIDI acquisition is just an example of us being very bullish on the future of addressable,” Welch adds. “We think that there’s huge opportunity both domestically and internationally.”

From its billing relationships with TV and mobile customers, AT&T garners verified subscriber identities. When those identities are coupled with third-party data in an anonymous, privacy compliant manner, AT&T can deliver addressable ads to TV sets and mobile devices.

“We’ll do this with our owned and operated apps,” Welch explains. “So if it’s a DIRECTV, TV Everywhere experience that someone is watching on a mobile device, we’ll be able to deliver a specific, targeted ad to that device as well as to their TV set.”

AT&T’s cross-device reach is amplified through a partnership with Opera Mediaworks, the mobile advertising and marketing platform that serves tens of thousands of apps, Welch explains.

“You don’t have to necessarily be watching content on just an AT&T app in order for us to do this cross-screen addressability,” Welch says of the association with Opera Mediaworks.

Asked about the buy-side sentiment for cross-screen addressable solutions, Welch says “We need to continue as sellers to prove that it works. We’re seeing significant lift when you have exposure across screens.”

He cites the case study of an automotive marketer that saw an 85% lift in buy rate among targeted consumers versus a control group that was not exposed to any ads on any screens. “That’s powerful,” says Welch. “If we could get that story out and make believers out of folks, I think you’ll see this market explode.”

We spoke with Welch at the Future of TV Advertising Forum in London. Beet.TV’s coverage is presented by the 605.  For other videos from the series, please visit this page

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INVIDI Buys GroupM A Place At Addressable’s Table: Gottlieb http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/16ftvgroupmgottlieb.html Fri, 02 Dec 2016 03:36:59 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43684 [...]]]> LONDON — In what is beginning to look like a season of exits for video ad-tech startups, addressable TV specialist INVIDI was last month acquired by AT&T, DISH and WPP.

The 16-year-old company has come in to its own of late, by helping advertisers serve household-targeted ads in to TV streams in the two minutes per hour of programming available to MVPDs, as well as gaining traction overseas.

But why did ad agency holding group WPP buy a stake in the company? Irwin Gotlieb, chairman of WPP’s leading GroupM, tells Beet.TV in this video interview.

“We entered in to INVIDI in the first place not because we wanted to control addressability, but we wanted to be inside the tent and we wanted to have influence on how the ecosystem involves,” he says.

“We never had any intentions of keeping our competitors out or of making anything exclusive to GroupM. We just wanted to be there at the table when the ecosystem was formed, and we wanted to ensure that that ecosystem serves the best interest of our clients.

“We retained our position in iNVIDI for exactly the same reasons.”

We spoke with Gotlieb at the Future of TV Advertising Forum in London. Beet.TV’s coverage is presented by the 605.  For other videos from the series, please visit this page

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UK’s Virgin Media Offers Addressable VOD, Liberty Global’s Paul Says http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/16ftvlibertypaul.html Fri, 02 Dec 2016 03:26:28 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43686 [...]]]> LONDON — It just launched its new V6 set-top box and a weird Android tablet this week and, though the kit reportedly does not upgrade the advertiser offering, according to The Drum, UK cable operator Virgin Media is already helping serve targeted ads inside catch-up programming.

Virgin Media, formed out of a merger of regional cable operators in the last couple of decades, is the UK’s second pay-TV provider after Sky. Unlike Sky, which leverages satellite for linear broadcast, Virgin Media’s trump card is fiber.

Back in 2010, the operator helped TiVo re-enter the UK when it selected the equipment maker to be its new set-top box. The commitment, made at the time, to embrace a new generation of apps never quite panned out, with a paucity of services running on a box that had become slow before V6’s arrival – although Virgin Media does, notably, carry Netflix and other TV channel apps, as well as broadcaster content through its own EPG.

But Virgin has, for some time, been offering the ability to serve custom ads in to broadcaster content when viewed as catch-up through that EPG. The new box will do the same, but will benefit from greater emphasis brought by a new sales team.

“Virgin is other star of the show,” says John Paul,  advanced advertising and data VP of LibertyGlobal, which acquired Virgin Media in 2013. “It has has a very valuable data set, a very forward-thinking CEO as well, who has created an entity called Virgin Media Solutions. That’s going to be our sales vehicle across all our addressable inventory across Ireland and the UK.”

What will Virgin Media Solutions be doing? Acting as the sales agency for its inventory on VOD and public WiFi (principally, London’s Underground) as well as Irish TV channel TV 3. But most of the heavy-lifting will be done by UK broadcasters who air over Virgin Media.

“We will be selling some aspects of the addressable ad inventory, but we will primarily be an enabler,” John adds. “Whether it’s ITV or Channel 4, they will do the selling of their inventory, we will match that for inventory we control with Virgin Media Solutions.

“We’re only doing it on VOD at the moment. We have quite a range of attributes that we can do addressable against. Our biggest opportunity to improve is the actual dynamic nature of that activity, the automation of it.”

We spoke with Paul at the Future of TV Advertising Forum in London this week. Beet.TV’s coverage is presented by the 605.  For other videos from the series, please visit this page

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Audience And Context Go Hand-In-Hand: Adobe’s Minmaugh http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/16bradobeminmaugh.html Thu, 01 Dec 2016 15:46:09 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43589 [...]]]> MIAMI — Take two bottles in to the shower? In advertising these days, strategies appear to have bifurcated along just two such lines.

In one, clients continue buying inventory around content deemed to match their target demographic. In the other, they buy super-targeted specific customers, regardless of where they are reading or viewing.

But strategies don’t have to be mutually exclusive, according to an Adobe exec helping marketers plan their executions.

“So much today we hear a lot about … it’s all about audience,” says Arthur Mimnaugh, Sr. Business Development Manager, Adobe Primetime, in this video interview with Beet.TV.

“But what we’d really like to do is work with our supply-side and publisher customers to really understand not just their audience, but where the intersection of their audience is with their content.

“People look at it as an ‘either-or’ and what we really look it as … you’re looking at the Venn diagram of kind of understanding where that intersection looks like and where that overlap is. And where that overlap is represents a massive opportunity to effectively monetize.”

In other words, advertisers shouldn’t have to pick between the old and new style of buying. In the modern ecosystem, they can do both in a way that supercharges the sum total of both.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Matt Prohaska, CEO of Prohaska Consulting.

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Traditional TV Measurement Won’t Lead To ‘The New World’: Omnicom’s Steuer http://www.beet.tv/2016/12/jonathan-steuer.html Thu, 01 Dec 2016 14:53:39 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43506 [...]]]> MIAMI – Marketers are ready to step off the “single-currency television ratings train,” but some agency buyers need to be prodded to look beyond Nielsen on the road to impression-based TV, says Jonathan Steuer, Chief Research Officer for Omnicom Media Group.

The buy side needs to understand that “questions and strategy” have to have top priority, “then you look for the appropriate research tools to answer those questions,” Steuer says in an interview with Beet.TV.

“It’s how the strategy side of agency life appears to work, but it’s certainly not how the buy side has worked because the data there has always been Nielsen,” Steuer says in response to a question from interviewer Tim Hanlon, Founder and CEO of The Vertere Group. “And since that’s the currency, people have said we’re not going to worry about anything else.”

Steuer’s views are shaped by a five-year stint at TiVo and a long career in research. “When I started in research and data in the media world, the great limiting step was availability of data. Now there’s plenty of data available. The question is how does the buy side use it,” he says.

Asked whether the continuing evolution of Nielsen’s measurement solutions will satisfy the industry’s needs, Steuer responds that those are the answers to the wrong test.

“They’re still solving the local ratings problem and the world is moving on to trying to think about impression based television,” says Steuer. “I don’t think their evolutionary path ever gets us to the new world.”

While Nielsen panels are useful calibrations for understanding individuals’ media usage across devices, other inputs are needed. Steuer mentions TVision, “which basically does attribution of who’s in front of the TV set using a camera,” and RealityMine, which did comprehensive measurement of cross-device viewing of the 2016 Summer Olympics.

“If what you’re trying to do is understand that cross-device usage, that super deep data set from a sample is awesome,” Steuer says. “But what you then need to do is take that small data world…and marry that to big data datasets that measure actual delivery of impressions.”

Omnicom’s clients are indicating they’re ready to take the plunge into impression delivery, according to Steuer. “They’re not going to do it with every dollar they spend, but they’re certainly willing to experiment,” he says. “And step off the single currency train and try something else because I think they realize they’re not being well served by the existing measurement tools.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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Consultant Prohaska: Addressable TV No Longer Just Theory http://www.beet.tv/2016/11/br16prohaskatv.html Wed, 30 Nov 2016 17:26:07 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43587 [...]]]> MIAMI — It needs to get bigger, but it’s not jus a scribble on a whiteboard anymore – the idea of targeting individual households with custom-placed TV ads, even in linear, is here and now.

So says the man who used to run programmatic advertising at The New York Times, no less.

“And the audience data pipes that have been connected, whether it’s through social or a lot of the same fundamentals from direct mail, are really starting to take hold,” says Matt Prohaska, now an independent consultant, in this video interview with Beet.TV. “You see it in people’s faces around here, where it’s not just theory anymore.

“It’s, ‘No, no, no we’ve actually done this and it’s real, it’s just, okay we want to now accelerate the actual process around this. We need a little more scale, we need the taxonomies to improve.”’Those are all just things that are gradually creating nice progress for everybody.”

Prohaska was responsible for global programmatic and channel revenue for the digital properties of The New York Times in display, search, text, mobile, and video between 2013 and 2014.

Now he runs his own Prohaska Consulting, with clients numbering Hulu, Grapeshot and Toyota.

Prohaska sees a world that’s changing fast. “A year ago, there was a little bit of people putting up crosses and wearing garlic and ‘get that programmatic word away from me completely’,” he recalls. “You’re starting to see enough at bats now from the sellers and certainly on the buy side.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Furious Corp CEO Ashley J. Swartz.

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Media Research Is Now Data Science: TiVo’s FitzGerald http://www.beet.tv/2016/11/16brtivofitzgerald.html Wed, 30 Nov 2016 15:12:46 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43588 [...]]]> MIAMI — In some ways, it was the usurping of the old guard by the new school. Earlier this year, TV data company Rovi acquired set-top box outfit TiVo in a deal valued at $1.1bn.

Then the combined entity took on the TiVo name, creating a corporation that own box the boxes and the data.

So you’ll forgive Joan FitzGerald for feeling like a kid in a candy store. Previously with Rovi, she is now VPof Product Management & Business Development for TiVo overall. And the long-time TV and data executive is witnessing a big change.

“One of the main shifts is the shift from what I’ll call media research to data science,” she tells Beet.TV in this video interview. “The investment in big data processing systems, that has happened both at the agency level and the media brands.

“Most notably, NBCUniversal, Turner, Viacom have all made huge investments in … enabling those systems to generate more value for the advertisers. On the advertising agency side, you see the same investments – they’re investing in big data and new people to make those operational systems work for them.”

This shift is just the latest in line with a common trend – the boosting of traditional human analytical skills with computer science, allowing customers to do more of what they did before, better and better.

And that’s something the new-look Rovi-TiVo is going to do partly after the acquisition which involved the TiVo Research and Analytics (TRA) unit.

“We’re able to combine the assets that TRA built over a number of years with our enterprise software system,” FitzGerald adds. “For example, they were really the first to market with audience targeting.

“Your whole buying and selling process is just more closely aligned with the marketer’s goals. So we’re really at the tip of the iceberg in terms of helping marketers understand targets in the context of their media spend.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Verte Group founder and CEO Tim Hanlon

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Advanced TV’s National Evolution: MODI’s Bologna http://www.beet.tv/2016/11/br16modibologna.html Wed, 30 Nov 2016 14:28:25 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43631 [...]]]> MIAMI — Addressable? Advanced? The way that television advertising is bought, targeted, sold and measured is changing.

The new connection of TVs and TV boxes to the internet is offering up household-level targeting, when ads are fuelled by smart data sets.

In this panel video interview at Beet Retreat 2016, Group M’s MODI Media president Mike Bologna, whose company is working in the emerging space, talks about how things are panning out.

“We all know that that business is developing and it’s building and we’re about half of every US TV household has that capability, and that’s great,” he says.

“You wind the clock back 18 months and you ask an advertiser who they want to reach, and they’ll look you straight in the eye and say adults 18-49. That’s pretty stupid. That’s changing.”

It’s not just targeting that is changing, however. Advanced TV is also getting plugged in to sales data, to show advertisers something approaching the ultimate ROI.

“When the campaign’s over and you tie it back to sales,” Bologna adds. “That’s the beauty of addressable television: if you execute it properly, meaning you get the target right, you pay the right price, and you measure it properly, you will show a higher return on ad spend than most national initiatives.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Furious Corp CEO Ashley J. Swartz.

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New AT&T Streaming Offerings: Fewer Barriers, More Ad Opportunities http://www.beet.tv/2016/11/brad-bentley.html Tue, 29 Nov 2016 22:22:00 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43664 [...]]]> Something for everybody pretty much describes AT&T’s launch on Nov. 30 of its three new streaming services: DIRECTV NOW, FreeVIEW and Fullscreen. It’s a way to both remove pain points for consumers—such as credit checks or the inability to access traditional cable service—and offer advertisers more VOD-first options, according to the EVP & CMO of AT&T Entertainment & Internet Services.

In an interview with Beet.TV, Brad Bentley says the company’s research shows that a number of consumers cannot get a TV plan that requires a credit check or a two year commitment, or can’t get cable installed in their dwelling.

“We knew going over the top and offering a customer an option that was more app-based, more software driven, was going to lower our costs and be able to serve an audience that we weren’t reaching today,” Bentley says.

He frames the proposition as, “How do we bring that premium television experience that had been traditionally locked in the living room and bring it to more people and more places.”

By signing up for DIRECTV NOW or Fullscreen, content can be streamed over U.S. Internet connections on any device with a set-top box, satellite dish, annual contract or credit check. DIRECTV NOW programming packages are: Live a Little ($35 monthly for 60+ channels); Just Right ($50 monthly for 80+ channels; Go Big ($60 monthly for 100+ channels); and Gotta Have it ($70 monthly for 120+ channels).

“We’ll offer consumers some choice in terms of packaging, but we have intentionally gone after some of that premium content that exists today in pay TV but just remove some of the hurdles,” Bentley says.

AT&T’s FreeVIEW offering lets anyone enjoy ad-supported video content free of charge from AUDIENCE Network, Otter Media properties and other channels on DIRECTV NOW.

For advertisers, the new services offer new formats so that they’re “not stuck in a traditional pod of 14 or 16 minutes of commercials in a one-hour slot,” Bentley explains. “It’s a VOD-first world where you can place ads within the curation.”

The platform supporting the new services also will facilitate “a better, smarter way to do ads around binge viewing than what exists today in terms of less ad load but more relevant ads,” says Bentley.

AT&T will continue to provide DIRECTV’s premium satellite TV entertainment service.

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Kristin Dolan Maps The Road Ahead For Data And Analytics Provider 605 http://www.beet.tv/2016/11/kristin-dolan.html Mon, 28 Nov 2016 23:41:35 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43492 [...]]]> MIAMI – Kristin Dolan, most recently COO of Cablevision Systems Corp, which was an early player in addressable television advertising, has a new day job. “It’s probably a bigger day job, but one that’s a little bit more self-directed and is really fun,” Dolan says of her role as CEO & Founder of 605.

As she describes the aspirations of 605, a data and analytics firm with roots in targeted political advertising, Dolan’s enthusiasm for mining insights from set-top boxes and other data sources is palpable. In an interview with Matter More Media CEO & Founder Tracey Scheppach at the recent Beet.TV Retreat 2016, Dolan traces the origins of 605 and explains why she’s “excited on a bunch of levels.”

Having sold Cablevision to French telecom firm Altice earlier in 2016, Dolan and her husband James, who had been CEO of Cablevision, recently announced that their Dolan Family Ventures acquired Analytics Media Group, a pioneer in the use of set-top box data. AMG now stands to gain from the confluence of its own “young and bright” minds and the Dolans’ several decades worth of advertising and media savvy, plus the leadership of 605 Co-Founder Ben Tatta, who was President of Cablevision Media Sales.

“It was such a perfect time for us,” Dolan says of the opportunity to invest in AMG, adding that the firm has “a level of experience that doesn’t really exist in a lot of places today, some IP and just a great team of folks.”

AMG’s credentials include work for Walmart and Uber plus “a really nice stable of clients that we’re going to continue to build on,” says Dolan, adding that 605 also will continue to service political advertisers.

Cablevision got into addressable TV in 2008 and now has more than seven million set-top boxes, with addressable available on more than 100 channels. Along the way, it developed its own tools to measure real-time performance for advertisers. “It was fun,” Dolan says of her 27 years in the business.

Now, she explains, “Our goal is to take set-top box data from a wide variety of sources, couple that with a lot of segmentation work that was already done by AMG and then continue to advance that to the benefit of people in the entertainment and media segment.”

605’s short-term focus will be on helping MVPD’s digest massive amounts of data and working with programmers large and small. “For the small networks that aren’t measured, utilization of set-top box and other data can allow them to have a sense of what their advertising and viewership is worth,” Dolan says.

Asked by Scheppach about addressable TV advertising going forward, Dolan cites a report in ADWEEK based on a study showing that 42% of U.S. households now can be reached via addressable TV ads.

“We firmly believe that relevant advertising, everybody wins. Why watch an ad that’s completely irrelevant to you when you can actually be getting something that might be of use,” Dolan notes.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

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DataXu’s Tellefsen Draws ‘Graph Of Graphs’ For TV Targeting Data http://www.beet.tv/2016/11/16brxutellefsen.html Mon, 28 Nov 2016 23:23:47 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43629 [...]]]> MIAMI — Want to target new TV ads with scientific precision? More and more US TVs are getting lit up with connectivity, making the real problem a back-end one.

In other words, getting hold of the right data, and combining it in the right way, is becoming the new transformative opportunity in future TV advertsiing.

How does DataXu, an ad-tech company invested in by Europe’s Sky satellite TV provider, approach that problem?

“One of the areas that we’ve consistently heard from our clients and from marketers and agencies that’s a real pain point is the ability to leverage first party and third party data in a targeted way against OTT,” says Tore Tellefsen, DataXu’s VP of TV solutions in this video interview with Beet.TV.

“Today, most of the way the activation happens on the publisher side. You do targeting through contextual or choosing your publishers and choosing your apps and whitelisting and having to do that across multiple different distribution points to try to aggregate enough volume and reach audiences that feel like they’re your audience or that sort of look and smell like your audience based on the apps or the content that they’re consuming.”

It’s enough to give an advertiser a headache.

But the solution boils down to the unsexy-sounding art of combining datasets.

“What we’ve been able to do is take our OneView cross-device graph technology … we term it a graph of graphs of graphs,” Tellefsen adds

“It leverages sort of best-in-class device graphs that are available in the industry with our own household graph and other sources and allows all of those to operate in tandem in real-time.”

After its investment, DataXu is building out its teams in Australia and New Zealand. The company’s founders were doing their PhD work at MIT on Mars mission software, before switching paths.

The company is also trying to get ahead of some big new European privacy regulations that are likely to pose a challenge to the advertising tech landscape in the continent.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Matt Prohaska, CEO of Prohaska Consulting.

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Gaskamp On Videology’s Transition To A SaaS Business http://www.beet.tv/2016/11/16brvideologybrent.html Mon, 28 Nov 2016 23:18:01 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43637 [...]]]> MIAMI — It’s become known as one of the major video ad-tech platforms on the block, allowing publishers and ad buyers to plan and executed targeting campaigns using an online dashboard.

But Videology didn’t start here. Nearly a decade ago, things were a little more hands-on – and the company had to hold its customers hands a lot more.

“When we came into the market, especially on the demand side, they were juggling all the display DSPs, the mobile DSPs; everything was separated at that time,” remembers Brent Gaskamp, Videology’s SVP for north American development. “And they were like, ‘Oh my God, here comes video. What am I going to do with this? Please, do it for me.’ Right?

“People needed somebody to look at video kind of separately from everything else that was going on in their world. And, over time, those clients have evolved into being self-service.

“I think somewhere around 95% of what we do is the self-service world, and then we have a few clients that still need help in various areas and we support them there.”

Videology’s tools include campaign planning, management and measurement for buyers, and inventory and audience management for publishers, while the outfit has also extended from digital video to linear TV.

While peer vendors have gone through consolidation or IPO, Videology remains independent.

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Matt Prohaska, CEO of Prohaska Consulting.

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‘Affinity Targeting’ Shows Marketers Unexpected Correlations, 4C’s Gupta Says http://www.beet.tv/2016/11/16br4cgupta.html Mon, 28 Nov 2016 00:04:04 +0000 http://www.beet.tv/?p=43504 [...]]]> MIAMI — What do Santa Claus and a stick of gum teach marketers about the future of advertising? Turns out, plenty, according to one ad-tech firm helping advertisers leverage social data to target TV and other commercials.

4C Insights’ Anupam Gupta calls it “affinity targeting”, and he says the new technique could be powerful.

“So, if you think about what’s happening on social from each of us as a consumer, right, everything we do on social media, whether it’s a tweet, a post, a comment, a like… that is an active action, right?,” Gupta tells Beet.TV in this video interview.

“So if you tap into that, right, there’s extremely rich data in an observed setting, right? Completely real data, real people, right, that you can kind of mine to get some real insights.”

Rated highly as an employer on Glassdoor, 4C Insights offers advertisers activations and analytics including ads delivered in social media that are linked to real-time TV play-out.

In September, the outfit took on a $26m Series C investment designed to fuel expansion across the world and in its product line-up – specifically, in the kind of affinity targeting delivery Gupta is talking about.

So what’s an example? Gupta explains: “Last year, we found that people who are following Santa Claus around a holiday timeframe, right, also had a very strong what we call ‘affinity’, right, you know, with a nicotine gum.

“Sometimes it comes up with extremely, you know, non-obvious, you know, kind of scenarios. You say, ‘Hey, listen, you know, people spending time with their kids and families are making a decision or trying to quit smoking at the time’.

“A marketer could take action very quickly on social media to run campaigns with the right creative etcetera to exactly those people who express this kind of behavior. The key here is combining signals, right, you know, from, let’s say. social media or other affinity sources.”

This interview was conducted at Beet Retreat 2016: The Transformation of Television Advertising, an executive retreat presented by Videology with AT&T AdWorks and the 605. Please find more videos from the event here.

This interview was conducted by Matt Prohaska, CEO of Prohaska Consulting.

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